Psalm 126:6
Parallel Verses
King James Version
He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.

Darby Bible Translation
He goeth forth and weepeth, bearing seed for scattering; he cometh again with rejoicing, bearing his sheaves.

World English Bible
He who goes out weeping, carrying seed for sowing, will certainly come again with joy, carrying his sheaves. A Song of Ascents. By Solomon.

Young's Literal Translation
Whoso goeth on and weepeth, Bearing the basket of seed, Surely cometh in with singing, bearing his sheaves!

Psalm 126:6 Parallel
Commentary
King James Translators' Notes

precious...: or, seed basket

Geneva Study Bible

He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing {e} precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.

(e) That is, seed which was scarce and dear: meaning, that they who trusted in God's promise to return had their desire.Psalm 126:6 Parallel Commentaries

Library
The Seed Growing Secretly.
"And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed into the ground; and should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle, because the harvest is come."--MARK iv. 26-29. This is the only parable that is peculiar to Mark. The subjects contained in
William Arnot—The Parables of Our Lord

The Comforts Belonging to Mourners
Having already presented to your view the dark side of the text, I shall now show you the light side, They shall be comforted'. Where observe: 1 Mourning goes before comfort as the lancing of a wound precedes the cure. The Antinomian talks of comfort, but cries down mourning for sin. He is like a foolish patient who, having a pill prescribed him, licks the sugar but throws away the pill. The libertine is all for joy and comfort. He licks the sugar but throws away the bitter pill of repentance. If
Thomas Watson—The Beatitudes: An Exposition of Matthew 5:1-12

Death Swallowed up in victory
Then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory! D eath, simply considered, is no more than the cessation of life --that which was once living, lives no longer. But it has been the general, perhaps the universal custom of mankind, to personify it. Imagination gives death a formidable appearance, arms it with a dart, sting or scythe, and represents it as an active, inexorable and invincible reality. In this view death is a great devourer; with his iron tongue
John Newton—Messiah Vol. 2

Psalm 126:5
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