Psalm 130:6
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
my soul waits for the Lord more than watchmen for the morning, more than watchmen for the morning.

King James Bible
My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning: I say, more than they that watch for the morning.

American Standard Version
My soul waiteth for the Lord More than watchmen wait for the morning; Yea, more than watchmen for the morning.

Douay-Rheims Bible
From the morning watch even until night, let Israel hope in the Lord.

English Revised Version
My soul looketh for the Lord, more than watchmen look for the morning; yea, more than watchmen for the morning.

Webster's Bible Translation
My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning: I say, more than they that watch for the morning.

Psalm 130:6 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The poet illustrates the fate that overtakes them by means of a picture borrowed from Isaiah and worked up (Psalm 37:27): they become like "grass of the housetops," etc. שׁ is a relative to יבשׁ (quod exarescit), and קדמת, priusquam, is Hebraized after מן־קדמת דּנה in Daniel 6:11, or מקּדמת דּנה in Ezra 5:11. שׁלף elsewhere has the signification "to draw forth" of a sword, shoe, or arrow, which is followed by the lxx, Theodotion, and the Quinta: πρὸ τοῦ ἐκσπασθῆναι, before it is plucked. But side by side with the ἐκσπασθῆναι of the lxx we also find the reading exanthee'sai; and in this sense Jerome renders (statim ut) viruerit, Symmachus ἐκκαυλῆσαι (to shoot into a stalk), Aquila ἀνέθαλεν, the Sexta ἐκστερεῶσαι (to attain to full solidity). The Targum paraphrases שׁלף in both senses: to shoot up and to pluck off. The former signification, after which Venema interprets: antequam se evaginet vel evaginetur, i.e., antequam e vaginulis suis se evolvat et succrescat, is also advocated by Parchon, Kimchi, and Aben-Ezra. In the same sense von Ortenberg conjectures שׁחלף. Since the grass of the house-tops or roofs, if one wishes to pull it up, can be pulled up just as well when it is withered as when it is green, and since it is the most natural thing to take חציר as the subject to שׁלף, we decide in favour of the intransitive signification, "to put itself forth, to develope, shoot forth into ear." The roof-grass withers before it has put forth ears of blossoms, just because it has no deep root, and therefore cannot stand against the heat of the sun.

(Note: So, too, Geiger in the Deutsche Morgenlndische Zeitschrift, xiv. 278f., according to whom Arab. slf (šlf) occurs in Saadia and Abu-Said in the signification "to be in the first maturity, to blossom," - a sense שׁלף may also have here; cf. the Talmudic שׁלופפי used of unripe dates that are still in blossom.)

The poet pursues the figure of the grass of the house-tops still further. The encompassing lap or bosom (κόλπος) is called elsewhere חצן (Isaiah 49:22; Nehemiah 5:13); here it is חצן, like the Arabic ḥiḍn (diminutive ḥoḍein), of the same root with מחוז, a creek, in Psalm 107:30. The enemies of Israel are as grass upon the house-tops, which is not garnered in; their life closes with sure destruction, the germ of which they (without any need for any rooting out) carry within themselves. The observation of Knapp, that any Western poet would have left off with Psalm 129:6, is based upon the error that Psalm 129:7-8 are an idle embellishment. The greeting addressed to the reapers in Psalm 129:8 is taken from life; it is not denied even to heathen reapers. Similarly Boaz (Ruth 2:4) greets them with "Jahve be with you," and receivers the counter-salutation, "Jahve bless thee." Here it is the passers-by who call out to those who are harvesting: The blessing (בּרכּת) of Jahve happen to you (אליכם,

(Note: Here and there עליכם is found as an error of the copyist. The Hebrew Psalter, Basel 1547, 12mo, notes it as a various reading.)

as in the Aaronitish blessing), and (since "we bless you in the name of Jahve" would be a purposeless excess of politeness in the mouth of the same speakers) receive in their turn the counter-salutation: We bless you in the name of Jahve. As a contrast it follows that there is before the righteous a garnering in of that which they have sown amidst the exchange of joyful benedictory greetings.

Psalm 130:6 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

waiteth

Psalm 63:6 When I remember you on my bed, and meditate on you in the night watches.

Psalm 119:147 I prevented the dawning of the morning, and cried: I hoped in your word.

Acts 27:29 Then fearing lest we should have fallen on rocks, they cast four anchors out of the stern, and wished for the day.

I say more than they that watch for the morning. or, which watch unto the morning

Psalm 134:1 Behold, bless you the LORD, all you servants of the LORD, which by night stand in the house of the LORD.

Isaiah 21:8 And he cried, A lion: My lord, I stand continually on the watchtower in the daytime, and I am set in my ward whole nights:

Cross References
Psalm 33:20
Our soul waits for the LORD; he is our help and our shield.

Psalm 63:6
when I remember you upon my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night;

Psalm 119:147
I rise before dawn and cry for help; I hope in your words.

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ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
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