Psalm 18:3
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
I call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised, and I am saved from my enemies.

King James Bible
I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from mine enemies.

American Standard Version
I will call upon Jehovah, who is worthy to be praised: So shall I be saved from mine enemies.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Praising I will call upon the Lord: and I shall be saved from my enemies.

English Revised Version
I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from mine enemies.

Webster's Bible Translation
I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from my enemies.

Psalm 18:3 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

Psalm 17:10 tell what sort of people these persecutors are. Their heart is called fat, adeps, not as though חלב could in itself be equivalent to לב, more especially as both words are radically distinct (חלב from the root לב, λιπ; לב from the root לב, לף to envelope: that which is enveloped, the kernel, the inside), but (without any need for von Ortenberg's conjecture חלב לבּמו סגרוּ "they close their heart with fat") because it is, as it were, entirely fat (Psalm 119:70, cf. Psalm 73:7), and because it is inaccessible to any feeling of compassion, and in general incapable of the nobler emotions. To shut up the fat equals the heart (cf. κλείειν τὰ σπλάγχνα 1 John 3:17), is equivalent to: to fortify one's self wilfully in indifference to sympathy, tender feeling, and all noble feelings (cf. השׁמין לב equals to harden, Isaiah 6:10). The construction of פּימו (which agrees in sound with פּימה, Job 15:27) is just the same as that of קולי, Psalm 3:5. On the other hand, אשּׁוּרנוּ (after the form עמּוּד and written plene) is neither such an accusative of the means or instrument, nor the second accusative, beside the accusative of the object, of that by which the object is surrounded, that is usually found with verbs of surrounding (e.g., Psalm 5:13; Psalm 32:7); for "they have surrounded me (us) with our step" is unintelligible. But אשׁורנו can be the accusative of the member, as in Psalm 3:8, cf. Psalm 22:17, Genesis 3:15, for "it is true the step is not a member" (Hitz.), but since "step" and "foot" are interchangeable notions, Psalm 73:2, the σχῆμα καθ ̓ ὅλον καὶ μέρος is applicable to the former, and as, e.g., Homer says, Iliad vii. 355: σὲ μάλιστα πόνος φρένας ἀμφιβέβηκεν, the Hebrew poet can also say: they have encompassed us (and in fact) our steps, each of our steps (so that we cannot go forwards or backwards with our feet). The Ker סבבוּנוּ gets rid of the change in number which we have with the Chethb סבבוני; the latter, however, is admissible according to parallels like Psalm 62:5, and corresponds to David's position, who is hunted by Saul and at the present time driven into a strait at the head of a small company of faithful followers. Their eyes - he goes on to say in Psalm 17:11 - have they set to fell, viz., us, who are encompassed, to the earth, i.e., so that we shall be cast to the ground. נטה is transitive, as in Psalm 18:10; Psalm 62:4, in the transitively applied sense of Psalm 73:2 (cf. Psalm 37:31): to incline to fall (whereas in Psalm 44:19, Job 31:7, it means to turn away from); and בּארץ (without any need fore the conjecture בּארח) expresses the final issue, instead of לארץ, Psalm 7:6. By the expression דּמינו one is prominently singled out from the host of the enemy, viz., its chief, the words being: his likeness is as a lion, according to the peculiarity of the poetical style, of changing verbal into substantival clauses, instead of דּמה כּאריה. Since in Old Testament Hebrew, as also in Syriac and Arabic, כ is only a preposition, not a connective conjunction, it cannot be rendered: as a lion longs to prey, but: as a lion that is greedy or hungry (cf. Arab. ksf, used of sinking away, decline, obscuring or eclipsing, growing pale, and Arab. chsf, more especially of enfeebling, hunger, distinct from חשׂף equals Arab. ks̆f, to peel off, make bare) to ravin. In the parallel member of the verse the participle alternates with the attributive clause. כּפיר is (according to Meier) the young lion as being covered with thicker hair.

Psalm 18:3 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I will

Psalm 5:2,3 Listen to the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for to you will I pray...

Psalm 28:1,2 To you will I cry, O LORD my rock; be not silent to me: lest, if you be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit...

Psalm 55:16 As for me, I will call on God; and the LORD shall save me.

Psalm 62:8 Trust in him at all times; you people, pour out your heart before him: God is a refuge for us. Selah.

2 Samuel 22:4 I will call on the LORD, who is worthy to be praised: so shall I be saved from my enemies.

Philippians 4:6,7 Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God...

who

Psalm 65:1,2 Praise waits for you, O God, in Sion: and to you shall the vow be performed...

Psalm 76:4 You are more glorious and excellent than the mountains of prey.

Nehemiah 9:5 Then the Levites, Jeshua, and Kadmiel, Bani, Hashabniah, Sherebiah, Hodijah...

Revelation 4:11 You are worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power: for you have created all things...

Revelation 5:12-14 Saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honor...

so shall

Psalm 50:15 And call on me in the day of trouble: I will deliver you, and you shall glorify me.

Psalm 91:15 He shall call on me, and I will answer him: I will be with him in trouble; I will deliver him, and honor him.

Luke 1:71 That we should be saved from our enemies, and from the hand of all that hate us;

Acts 2:21 And it shall come to pass, that whoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved.

Romans 8:31-39 What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us...

Cross References
Psalm 34:6
This poor man cried, and the LORD heard him and saved him out of all his troubles.

Psalm 48:1
Great is the LORD and greatly to be praised in the city of our God! His holy mountain,

Psalm 96:4
For great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised; he is to be feared above all gods.

Psalm 113:3
From the rising of the sun to its setting, the name of the LORD is to be praised!

Psalm 145:3
Great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised, and his greatness is unsearchable.

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