Psalm 29:5
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
The voice of the LORD breaks the cedars; the LORD breaks the cedars of Lebanon.

King James Bible
The voice of the LORD breaketh the cedars; yea, the LORD breaketh the cedars of Lebanon.

American Standard Version
The voice of Jehovah breaketh the cedars; Yea, Jehovah breaketh in pieces the cedars of Lebanon.

Douay-Rheims Bible
The voice of the Lord breaketh the cedars: yea, the Lord shall break the cedars of Libanus.

English Revised Version
The voice of the LORD breaketh the cedars; yea, the LORD breaketh in pieces the cedars of Lebanon.

Webster's Bible Translation
The voice of the LORD breaketh the cedars; yes, the LORD breaketh the cedars of Lebanon.

Psalm 29:5 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The first half of the Psalm prayed for deliverance and for judgment; this second half gives thanks for both. If the poet wrote the Psalm at one sitting then at this point the certainty of being answered dawns upon him. But it is even possible that he added this second part later on, as a memorial of the answer he experienced to his prayer (Hitzig, Ewald). It sounds, at all events, like the record of something that has actually taken place. Jahve is his defence and shield. The conjoined perfects in Psalm 28:7 denote that which is closely united in actual realisation; and in the fut. consec., as is frequently the case, e.g., in Job 14:2, the historical signification retreats into the background before the more essential idea of that which has been produced. In משּׁירי, the song is conceived as the spring whence the הודות bubble forth; and instead of אודנּוּ we have the more impressive form אהודנּוּ, as in Psalm 45:18; Psalm 116:6; 1 Samuel 17:47, the syncope being omitted. From suffering (Leid) springs song (Lied), and from song springs the praise (Lob) of Him, who has "turned" the suffering, just as it is attuned in Psalm 28:6 and Psalm 28:8.

(Note: There is a play of words and an alliteration in this sentence which we cannot fully reproduce in the English. - Tr.)

The αὐτοί, who are intended by למו in Psalm 28:8, are those of Israel, as in Psalm 12:8; Isaiah 33:2 (Hitzig). The lxx (κραταίωμα τοῦ λαοῦ αὐτοῦ) reads לעמּו, as in Psalm 29:11, which is approved by Bצttcher, Olshausen and Hupfeld; but למו yields a similar sense. First of all David thinks of the people, then of himself; for his private character retreats behind his official, by virtue of which he is the head of Israel. For this very reason his deliverance is the deliverance of Israel, to whom, so far as they have become unfaithful to His anointed, Jahve has not requited this faithlessness, and to whom, so far as they have remained true to him, He has rewarded this fidelity. Jahve is a עז a si evhaJ to them, inasmuch as He preserves them by His might from the destruction into which they would have precipitated themselves, or into which others would have precipitated them; and He is the מעוז ישׁוּעות of His anointed inasmuch as He surrounds him as an inaccessible place of refuge which secures to him salvation in all its fulness instead of the destruction anticipated. Israel's salvation and blessing were at stake; but Israel is in fact God's people and God's inheritance - may He, then, work salvation for them in every future need and bless them. Apostatised from David, it was a flock in the hands of the hireling - may He ever take the place of shepherd to them and carry them in His arms through the destruction. The נשּׂאם coupled with וּרעם (thus it is to be pointed according to Ben-Asher) calls to mind Deuteronomy 1:31, "Jahve carried Israel as a man doth carry his son," and Exodus 19:4; Deuteronomy 32:11, "as on eagles' wings." The Piel, as in Isaiah 63:9, is used of carrying the weak, whom one lifts up and thus removes out of its helplessness and danger. Psalm 3:1-8 closes just in the same way with an intercession; and the close of Psalm 29:1-11 is similar, but promissory, and consequently it is placed next to Psalm 28:1-9.

Psalm 29:5 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Isaiah 2:13 And on all the cedars of Lebanon, that are high and lifted up, and on all the oaks of Bashan,

Cross References
Judges 9:15
And the bramble said to the trees, 'If in good faith you are anointing me king over you, then come and take refuge in my shade, but if not, let fire come out of the bramble and devour the cedars of Lebanon.'

1 Kings 5:6
Now therefore command that cedars of Lebanon be cut for me. And my servants will join your servants, and I will pay you for your servants such wages as you set, for you know that there is no one among us who knows how to cut timber like the Sidonians."

Psalm 104:16
The trees of the LORD are watered abundantly, the cedars of Lebanon that he planted.

Isaiah 2:13
against all the cedars of Lebanon, lofty and lifted up; and against all the oaks of Bashan;

Isaiah 14:8
The cypresses rejoice at you, the cedars of Lebanon, saying, 'Since you were laid low, no woodcutter comes up against us.'

Jump to Previous
Breaketh Breaks Broken Cedars Cedar-Trees Lebanon Pieces Shivers Voice
Jump to Next
Breaketh Breaks Broken Cedars Cedar-Trees Lebanon Pieces Shivers Voice
Links
Psalm 29:5 NIV
Psalm 29:5 NLT
Psalm 29:5 ESV
Psalm 29:5 NASB
Psalm 29:5 KJV

Psalm 29:5 Bible Apps
Psalm 29:5 Biblia Paralela
Psalm 29:5 Chinese Bible
Psalm 29:5 French Bible
Psalm 29:5 German Bible

Bible Hub

ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Psalm 29:4
Top of Page
Top of Page