Psalm 30:1
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
I will extol you, O LORD, for you have drawn me up and have not let my foes rejoice over me.

King James Bible
A Psalm and Song at the dedication of the house of David. I will extol thee, O LORD; for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

American Standard Version
I will extol thee, O Jehovah; for thou hast raised me up, And hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

Douay-Rheims Bible
A psalm of a canticle, at the dedication of David's house. I will extol thee, O Lord, for thou hast upheld me: and hast not made my enemies to rejoice over me.

English Revised Version
A Psalm; a Song at the Dedication of the House; a Psalm of David. I will extol thee, O LORD; for thou hast raised me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

Webster's Bible Translation
A Psalm and Song, at the dedication of the house of David. I will extol thee, O LORD; for thou hast lifted me up, and hast not made my foes to rejoice over me.

Psalm 30:1 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

Now follows the description of the revelation of God's power, which is the ground of the summons, and is to be the subject-matter of their praise. The All-glorious One makes Himself heard in the language (Revelation 10:3.) of the thunder, and reveals Himself in the storm. There are fifteen lines, which naturally arrange themselves into three five-line strophes. The chief matter with the poet, however, is the sevenfold קול ה. Although קול is sometimes used almost as an ejaculatory "Hark!" (Genesis 4:10; Isaiah 52:8), this must not, with Ewald (286, f), be applied to the קול ה of the Psalm before us, the theme of which is the voice of God, who announced Himself from heaven - a voice which moves the world. The dull sounding קול serves not merely to denote the thunder of the storm, but even the thunder of the earthquake, the roar of the tempest, and in general, every low, dull, rumbling sound, by which God makes Himself audible to the world, and more especially from the wrathful side of His doxa. The waters in Psalm 29:3 are not the lower waters. Then the question arises what are they? Were the waters of the Mediterranean intended, they would be more definitely denoted in such a vivid description. It is, however, far more appropriate to the commencement of this description to understand them to mean the mass of water gathered together in the thick, black storm-clouds (vid., Psalm 18:12; Jeremiah 10:13). The rumbling

(Note: The simple rendering of קול by "voice" has been retained in the text of the Psalm, as in the Authorised Version. The word, however, which Dr. Delitzsch uses is Gedrhn, the best English equivalent of which is a "rumbling." - Tr.)

of Jahve is, as the poet himself explains in Psalm 29:3, the thunder produced on high by the אל הכּבוד (cf. מלך הכבוד, Psalm 24:7.), which rolls over the sea of waters floating above the earth in the sky. Psalm 29:4 and Psalm 29:4, just like Psalm 29:3 and Psalm 29:3, are independent substantival clauses. The rumbling of Jahve is, issues forth, or passes by; ב with the abstract article as in Psalm 77:14; Proverbs 24:5 (cf. Proverbs 8:8; Luke 4:32, ἐν ἰσχύΐ Revelation 18:2), is the ב of the distinctive attribute. In Psalm 29:3 the first peals of thunder are heard; in Psalm 29:4 the storm is coming nearer, and the peals become stronger, and now it bursts forth with its full violence: Psalm 29:5 describes this in a general form, and Psalm 29:5 expresses by the fut. consec., as it were inferentially, that which is at present taking place: amidst the rolling of the thunder the descending lightning flashes rive the cedars of Lebanon (as is well-known, the lightning takes the outermost points). The suffix in Psalm 29:6 does not refer proleptically to the mountains mentioned afterwards, but naturally to the cedars (Hengst., Hupf., Hitz.), which bend down before the storm and quickly rise up again. The skipping of Lebanon and Sirion, however, is not to be referred to the fact, that their wooded summits bend down and rise again, but, according to Psalm 114:4, to their being shaken by the crash of the thunder-a feature in the picture which certainly does not rest upon what is actually true in nature, but figuratively describes the apparent quaking of the earth during a heavy thunderstorm. שריון, according to Deuteronomy 3:9, is the Sidonian name of Hermon, and therefore side by side with Lebanon it represents Anti-Lebanon. The word, according to the Masora, has ש sinistrum, and consequently is isriyown, wherefore Hitzig correctly derives it from Arab. srâ, fut. i., to gleam, sparkle, cf. the passage from an Arab poet at Psalm 133:3. The lightning makes these mountains bound (Luther, lecken, i.e., according to his explanation: to spring, skip) like young antelopes. ראם,

(Note: On Arab. r'm vid., Seetzen's Reisen iii. 339 and also iv. 496.)

like βούβαλος, βούβαλις, is a generic name of the antelope, and of the buffalo that roams in herds through the forests beyond the Jordan even at the present day; for there are antelopes that resemble the buffalo and also (except in the formation of the head and the cloven hoofs) those that resemble the horse, the lxx renders: ὡς υἱὸς μονοκερώτων. Does this mean the unicorn Germ. one-horn depicted on Persian and African monuments? Is this unicorn distinct from the one horned antelope? Neither an unicorn nor an one horned antelope have been seen to the present day by any traveller. Both animals, and consequently also their relation to one another, are up to the present time still undefinable from a scientific point of view.

(Note: By ראם Ludolf in opposition to Bochart understands the rhinoceros; but this animal, belonging to the swine tribe, is certainly not meant, or even merely associated with it. Moreover, the rhinoceros Germ. nose-horn is called in Egypt charnin (from Arab. chrn equals qrn), but the unicorn, charnit. "In the year 1862 the French archaeologist, M. Waddington, was with me in Damascus when an antiquary brought me an ancient vessel on which a number of animals were engraved, their names being written on their bellies. Among the well known animals there was also an unicorn, exactly like a zebra or a horse, but with a long horn standing out upon its forehead; on its body was the word Arab. chrnı̂t. M. Waddington wished to have the vessel and I gave it up to him; and he took it with him to Paris. We talked a good deal about this unicorn, and felt obliged to come to the conclusion that the form of the fabulous animal might have become known to the Arabs at the time of the crusades, when the English coat of arms came to Syria." - Wetzstein.)

Each peal of thunder is immediately followed by a flash of lightning; Jahve's thunder cleaveth flames of fire, i.e., forms (as it were λατομεῖ) the fire-matter of the storm-clouds into cloven flames of fire, into lightnings that pass swiftly along; in connection with which it must be remembered that קול ה denotes not merely the thunder as a phenomenon, but at the same time it denotes the omnipotence of God expressing itself therein. The brevity and threefold division of Psalm 29:7 depicts the incessant, zigzag, quivering movement of the lightning (tela trisulca, ignes trisulci, in Ovid). From the northern mountains the storm sweeps on towards the south of Palestine into the Arabian desert, viz., as we are told in Psalm 29:8 (cf. Psalm 29:5, according to the schema of "parallelism by reservation"), the wilderness region of Kadesh (Kadesh Barnea), which, however we may define its position, must certainly have lain near the steep western slope of the mountains of Edom toward the Arabah. Jahve's thunder, viz., the thunderstorm, puts this desert in a state of whirl, inasmuch as it drives the sand (חול) before it in whirlwinds; and among the mountains it, viz., the strong lightning and thundering, makes the hinds to writhe, inasmuch as from fright they bring forth prematurely. both the Hiph. יהיל and the Pil. יחולל are used with a causative meaning (root חו, חי, to move in a circle, to encircle). The poet continues with ויּחשׂף, since he makes one effect of the storm to develope from another, merging as it were out of its chrysalis state. יערות is a poetical plural form; and חשׂף describes the effect of the storm which "shells" the woods, inasmuch as it beats down the branches of the trees, both the tops and the foliage. While Jahve thus reveals Himself from heaven upon the earth in all His irresistible power, בּהיכלו, in His heavenly palace (Psalm 11:4; Psalm 18:7), כּלּו (note how בהיכלו resolves this כלו out of itself), i.e., each of the beings therein, says: כבוד. That which the poet, in Psalm 29:1, has called upon them to do, now takes place. Jahve receives back His glory, which is immanent in the universe, in the thousand-voiced echo of adoration.

Psalm 30:1 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

A.M.

2987 B.C.

1017 (title) A psalm. or 'A psalm or song of David, at the dedication of the house;' by which is supposed to be meant the place he built on the threshing floor of Araunab, after the grievous plague which had nearly desolated the kingdom

2 Samuel 24:25 And David built there an altar to the LORD, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. So the LORD was entreated for the land...

1 Chronicles 21:6 But Levi and Benjamin counted he not among them: for the king's word was abominable to Joab.

at the

Deuteronomy 20:5 And the officers shall speak to the people, saying, What man is there that has built a new house, and has not dedicated it?...

2 Samuel 5:11 And Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, and carpenters, and masons: and they built David an house.

2 Samuel 6:20 Then David returned to bless his household. And Michal the daughter of Saul came out to meet David, and said...

2 Samuel 7:2 That the king said to Nathan the prophet, See now, I dwell in an house of cedar, but the ark of God dwells within curtains.

2 Samuel 20:3 And David came to his house at Jerusalem; and the king took the ten women his concubines, whom he had left to keep the house...

extol

Psalm 34:3,4 O magnify the LORD with me, and let us exalt his name together...

Psalm 66:17 I cried to him with my mouth, and he was extolled with my tongue.

Psalm 145:1 I will extol you, my God, O king; and I will bless your name for ever and ever.

Daniel 4:37 Now I Nebuchadnezzar praise and extol and honor the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgment...

for

Psalm 27:6 And now shall my head be lifted up above my enemies round about me: therefore will I offer in his tabernacle sacrifices of joy...

Psalm 28:9 Save your people, and bless your inheritance: feed them also, and lift them up for ever.

hast not

Psalm 13:4 Lest my enemy say, I have prevailed against him; and those that trouble me rejoice when I am moved.

Psalm 25:2 O my God, I trust in you: let me not be ashamed, let not my enemies triumph over me.

Psalm 35:19,24,25 Let not them that are my enemies wrongfully rejoice over me: neither let them wink with the eye that hate me without a cause...

Psalm 41:11 By this I know that you favor me, because my enemy does not triumph over me.

Psalm 79:4,10 We are become a reproach to our neighbors, a scorn and derision to them that are round about us...

Psalm 89:41-46 All that pass by the way spoil him: he is a reproach to his neighbors...

Psalm 140:8 Grant not, O LORD, the desires of the wicked: further not his wicked device; lest they exalt themselves. Selah.

Lamentations 2:15 All that pass by clap their hands at you; they hiss and wag their head at the daughter of Jerusalem, saying...

Cross References
2 Samuel 5:11
And Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house.

Psalm 3:3
But you, O LORD, are a shield about me, my glory, and the lifter of my head.

Psalm 25:2
O my God, in you I trust; let me not be put to shame; let not my enemies exult over me.

Psalm 35:19
Let not those rejoice over me who are wrongfully my foes, and let not those wink the eye who hate me without cause.

Psalm 35:24
Vindicate me, O LORD, my God, according to your righteousness, and let them not rejoice over me!

Psalm 66:17
I cried to him with my mouth, and high praise was on my tongue.

Psalm 118:28
You are my God, and I will give thanks to you; you are my God; I will extol you.

Jump to Previous
Blessing Cause David Dedication Depths Drawn Enemies Exalt Extol Foes Glad Haters Honour House Lifted Praise Psalm Raised Rejoice Song Temple
Jump to Next
Blessing Cause David Dedication Depths Drawn Enemies Exalt Extol Foes Glad Haters Honour House Lifted Praise Psalm Raised Rejoice Song Temple
Links
Psalm 30:1 NIV
Psalm 30:1 NLT
Psalm 30:1 ESV
Psalm 30:1 NASB
Psalm 30:1 KJV

Psalm 30:1 Bible Apps
Psalm 30:1 Biblia Paralela
Psalm 30:1 Chinese Bible
Psalm 30:1 French Bible
Psalm 30:1 German Bible

Bible Hub

ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Psalm 29:11
Top of Page
Top of Page