Psalm 46:8
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
Come, behold the works of the LORD, how he has brought desolations on the earth.

King James Bible
Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth.

American Standard Version
Come, behold the works of Jehovah, What desolations he hath made in the earth.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Come and behold ye the works of the Lord: what wonders he hath done upon earth,

English Revised Version
Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth.

Webster's Bible Translation
Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth.

Psalm 46:8 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

(Heb.: 46:2-4) The congregation begins with a general declaration of that which God is to them. This declaration is the result of their experience. Luther, after the lxx and Vulg., renders it, "in the great distresses which have come upon us." As though נמצא could stand for הנּמצעות, and that this again could mean anything else but "at present existing," to which מאד is not at all appropriate. God Himself is called נמצא מאד as being one who allows Himself to be found in times of distress (2 Chronicles 15:4, and frequently) exceedingly; i.e., to those who then seek Him He reveals Himself and verifies His word beyond all measure. Because God is such a God to them, the congregation or church does not fear though a still greater distress than that which they have just withstood, should break in upon them: if the earth should change, i.e., effect, enter upon, undergo or suffer a change (an inwardly transitive Hiphil, Ges. ֗53, 2); and if the mountains should sink down into the heart (בּלב exactly as in Ezekiel 27:27; Jonah 2:4) of the sea (ocean), i.e., even if these should sink back again into the waters out of which they appeared on the third day of the creation, so that consequently the old chaos should return. The church supposes the most extreme case, viz., the falling in of the universe which has been creatively set in order. We are no more to regard the language as being allegorical here (as Hengstenberg interprets it, the mountains being equals the kingdoms of the world), than we would the language of Horace: si fractus illabatur orbis (Carm. iii. 3, 7). Since ימּים is not a numerical but amplificative plural, the singular suffixes in Psalm 46:4 may the more readily refer back to it. גּאוה, pride, self-exaltation, used of the sea as in Psalm 89:10 גּאוּת, and in Job 38:11 גּאון are used. The futures in Psalm 46:4 do not continue the infinitive construction: if the waters thereof roar, foam, etc.; but they are, as their position and repetition indicate, intended to have a concessive sense. And this favours the supposition of Hupfeld and Ewald that the refrain, Psalm 46:8, 12, which ought to form the apodosis of this concessive clause (cf. Psalm 139:8-10; Job 20:24; Isaiah 40:30.) has accidentally fallen out here. In the text as it lies before us Psalm 46:4 attaches itself to לא־נירא: (we do not fear), let its waters (i.e., the waters of the ocean) rage and foam continually; and, inasmuch as the sea rises high, towering beyond its shores, let the mountains threaten to topple in. The music, which here becomes forte, strengthens the believing confidence of the congregation, despite this wild excitement of the elements.

Psalm 46:8 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Come

Psalm 66:5 Come and see the works of God: he is terrible in his doing toward the children of men.

Psalm 92:4-6 For you, LORD, have made me glad through your work: I will triumph in the works of your hands...

Psalm 111:2,3 The works of the LORD are great, sought out of all them that have pleasure therein...

Numbers 23:23 Surely there is no enchantment against Jacob, neither is there any divination against Israel...

desolations

Exodus 10:7 And Pharaoh's servants said to him, How long shall this man be a snare to us? let the men go, that they may serve the LORD their God...

Exodus 12:30 And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he, and all his servants, and all the Egyptians; and there was a great cry in Egypt...

Exodus 14:30,31 Thus the LORD saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead on the sea shore...

Joshua 11:20 For it was of the LORD to harden their hearts, that they should come against Israel in battle, that he might destroy them utterly...

2 Chronicles 20:23,24 For the children of Ammon and Moab stood up against the inhabitants of mount Seir, utterly to slay and destroy them...

Isaiah 24:1 Behold, the LORD makes the earth empty, and makes it waste, and turns it upside down, and scatters abroad the inhabitants thereof.

Isaiah 34:2 For the indignation of the LORD is on all nations, and his fury on all their armies: he has utterly destroyed them...

Cross References
Psalm 66:5
Come and see what God has done: he is awesome in his deeds toward the children of man.

Isaiah 61:4
They shall build up the ancient ruins; they shall raise up the former devastations; they shall repair the ruined cities, the devastations of many generations.

Jeremiah 51:43
Her cities have become a horror, a land of drought and a desert, a land in which no one dwells, and through which no son of man passes.

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ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
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