Psalm 63:6
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
when I remember you upon my bed, and meditate on you in the watches of the night;

King James Bible
When I remember thee upon my bed, and meditate on thee in the night watches.

American Standard Version
When I remember thee upon my bed, And meditate on thee in the night-watches.

Douay-Rheims Bible
If I have remembered thee upon my bed, I will meditate on thee in the morning:

English Revised Version
When I remember thee upon my bed, and meditate on thee in the night watches.

Webster's Bible Translation
When I remember thee upon my bed, and meditate on thee in the night watches.

Psalm 63:6 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

Just as all men with everything earthly upon which they rely are perishable, so also the purely earthly form which the new kingship has assumed carries within itself the germ of ruin; and God will decide as Judge, between the dethroned and the usurpers, in accordance with the relationship in which they stand to Him. This is the internal connection of the third group with the two preceding ones. By means of the strophe vv. 10-13, our Psalm is brought into the closest reciprocal relationship with Psalm 39:1-13. Concerning בּני־אדם and בּני־אישׁ vid., on Psalm 49:3; Psalm 4:3. The accentuation divides Psalm 62:10 quite correctly. The Athnach does not mark בּמאזנים לעלות as an independent clause: they are upon the balance לעלות, for a going up; they must rise, so light are they (Hengstenberg). Certainly this expression of the periphrastic future is possible (vid., on Psalm 25:14; Psalm 1:1-6 :17), still we feel the want here of the subject, which cannot be dispensed within the clause as an independent one. Since, however, the combining of the words with what follows is forbidden by the fact that the infinitive with ל in the sense of the ablat. gerund. always comes after the principal clause, not before it (Ew. 280, d), we interpret: upon the balances ad ascendendum equals certo ascensuri, and in fact so that this is an attributive that is co-ordinate with כּזב. Is the clause following now meant to affirm that men, one and all, belong to nothingness or vanity (מן partitivum), or that they are less than nothing (מן comparat.)? Umbreit, Stier, and others explain Isaiah 40:17 also in the latter way; but parallels like Isaiah 41:24 do not favour this rendering, and such as Isaiah 44:11 are opposed to it. So also here the meaning is not that men stand under the category of that which is worthless or vain, but that they belong to the domain of the worthless or vain.

The warning in Psalm 62:11 does not refer to the Absalomites, but, pointing to these as furnishing a salutary example, to those who, at the sight of the prosperous condition and joyous life on that side, might perhaps be seized with envy and covetousness. Beside בּטח בּ the meaning of הבל בּ is nevertheless not: to set in vain hope upon anything (for the idea of hoping does not exist in this verb in itself, Job 27:12; Jeremiah 2:5, nor in this construction of the verb), but: to be befooled, blinded by something vain (Hitzig). Just as they are not to suffer their heart to be befooled by their own unjust acquisition, so also are they not, when the property of others increases (נוּב, root נב, to raise one's self, to mount up; cf. Arabic nabata, to sprout up, grow; nabara, to raise; intransitive, to increase, and many other verbal stems), to turn their heart towards it, as though it were something great and fortunate, that merited special attention and commanded respect. Two great truths are divinely attested to the poet. It is not to be rendered: once hath God spoken, now twice (Job 40:5; 2 Kings 6:10) have I heard this; but after Psalm 89:36 : One thing hath God spoken, two things (it is) that I have heard; or in accordance with the interpunction, which here, as in Psalm 12:8 (cf. on Psalm 9:16), is not to be called in question: these two things have I heard. Two divine utterances actually do follow. The two great truths are: (1) that God has the power over everything earthly, that consequently nothing takes place without Him, and that whatever is opposed to Him must sooner or later succumb; (2) that of this very God, the sovereign Lord (אדני), is mercy also, the energy of which is measured by His omnipotence, and which does not suffer him to succumb upon whom it is bestowed. With כּי the poet establishes these two revealed maxims which God has impressed upon his mind, from His righteous government as displayed in the history of men. He recompenses each one in accordance with his doing, κατὰ τὰ ἔργα αὐτοῦ, as Paul confesses (Romans 2:6) no less than David, and even (vid., lxx) in the words of David. It shall be recompensed unto every man according to his conduct, which is the issue of his relationship to God. He who rises in opposition to the will and order of God, shall feel God's power (עז) as a power for punishment that dashes in pieces; and he who, anxious for salvation, resigns his own will to the will of God, receives from God's mercy or loving-kindness (חסד), as from an overflowing fulness, the promised reward of faithfulness: his resignation becomes experience, and his hoping attainment.

Psalm 63:6 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Psalm 42:8 Yet the LORD will command his loving kindness in the day time, and in the night his song shall be with me...

Psalm 77:4-6 You hold my eyes waking: I am so troubled that I cannot speak...

Psalm 119:55,147,148 I have remembered your name, O LORD, in the night, and have kept your law...

Psalm 139:17,18 How precious also are your thoughts to me, O God! how great is the sum of them!...

Psalm 149:5 Let the saints be joyful in glory: let them sing aloud on their beds.

Songs 3:1,2 By night on my bed I sought him whom my soul loves: I sought him, but I found him not...

Songs 5:2 I sleep, but my heart wakes: it is the voice of my beloved that knocks, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love...

Lamentations 2:19 Arise, cry out in the night: in the beginning of the watches pour out your heart like water before the face of the LORD...

Cross References
Psalm 1:2
but his delight is in the law of the LORD, and on his law he meditates day and night.

Psalm 4:4
Be angry, and do not sin; ponder in your own hearts on your beds, and be silent. Selah

Psalm 16:7
I bless the LORD who gives me counsel; in the night also my heart instructs me.

Psalm 42:8
By day the LORD commands his steadfast love, and at night his song is with me, a prayer to the God of my life.

Psalm 77:2
In the day of my trouble I seek the Lord; in the night my hand is stretched out without wearying; my soul refuses to be comforted.

Psalm 119:55
I remember your name in the night, O LORD, and keep your law.

Psalm 119:148
My eyes are awake before the watches of the night, that I may meditate on your promise.

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ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
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