Psalm 89:49
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
Lord, where is your steadfast love of old, which by your faithfulness you swore to David?

King James Bible
Lord, where are thy former lovingkindnesses, which thou swarest unto David in thy truth?

American Standard Version
Lord, where are thy former lovingkindnesses, Which thou swarest unto David in thy faithfulness?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Lord, where are thy ancient mercies, according to what thou didst swear to David in thy truth?

English Revised Version
Lord, where are thy former mercies, which thou swarest unto David in thy faithfulness?

Webster's Bible Translation
Lord, where are thy former loving-kindnesses, which thou didst swear to David in thy truth?

Psalm 89:49 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

Now after the poet has turned his thoughts towards the beginnings of the house of David which were so rich in promise, in order that he might find comfort under the sorrowful present, the contrast of the two periods is become all the more sensible to him. With ואתּה in Psalm 89:39 (And Thou - the same who hast promised and affirmed this with an oath) his Psalm takes a new turn, for which reason it might even have been ועתּה. זנח is used just as absolutely here as in Psalm 44:24; Psalm 74:1; Psalm 77:8, so that it does not require any object to be supplied out of Psalm 89:39. נארתּה in Psalm 89:40 the lxx renders kate'strepsas; it is better rendered in Lamentations 2:7 ἀπετίναξε; for נאר is synonymous with נער, to shake off, push away, cf. Arabic el-menâ‛ir, the thrusters (with the lance). עבדּך is a vocational name of the king as such. His crown is sacred as being the insignia of a God-bestowed office. God has therefore made the sacred thing vile by casting it to the ground (חלּל לארץ, as in Psalm 74:17, to cast profaningly to the ground). The primary passage to Psalm 89:41-42, is Psalm 80:13. "His hedges" are all the boundary and protecting fences which the land of the king has; and מבצריו "the fortresses" of his land (in both instances without כל, because matters have not yet come to such a pass).

(Note: In the list of the nations and cities conquered by King Sheshonk I are found even cities of the tribe of Issachar, e.g., Shen-ma-an, Sunem; vid., Brugsch, Reiseberichte, S. 141-145, and Blau as referred to above.)

In שׁסּהוּ the notions of the king and of the land blend together. עברי־דרך are the hordes of the peoples passing through the land. שׁכניו are the neighbouring peoples that are otherwise liable to pay tribute to the house of David, who sought to take every possible advantage of that weakening of the Davidic kingdom. In Psalm 89:44 we are neither to translate "rock of his sword" (Hengstenberg), nor "O rock" (Olshausen). צוּר does not merely signify rupes, but also from another root (צוּר, Arab. ṣâr, originally of the grating or shrill noise produced by pressing and squeezing, then more particularly to cut or cut off with pressure, with a sharply set knife or the like) a knife or a blade (cf. English knife, and German kneifen, to nip): God has decreed it that the edge or blade of the sword of the king has been turned back by the enemy, that he has not been able to maintain his ground in battle (הקמתו with ē instead of ı̂, as also when the tone is not moved forward, Micah 5:4). In Psalm 89:45 the Mem of מטהרו, after the analogy of Ezekiel 16:41; Ezekiel 34:10, and other passages, is a preposition: cessare fecisti eum a splendore suo. A noun מטּהר equals מטהר with Dag. dirimens,

(Note: The view of Pinsker (Einleitung, S. 69), that this Dag. is not a sign of the doubling of the letter, but a diacritic point (that preceded the invention of the system of vowel-points), which indicated that the respective letter was to be pronounced with a Chateph vowel (e.g., miṭŏhar), is incorrect. The doubling Dag. renders the Sheb audible, and having once become audible it readily receives this or that colouring according to the nature of its consonant and of the neighbouring vowel.)

like מקדּשׁ Exodus 15:17, מנּזר Nahum 3:17 (Abulwald, Aben-Ezra, Parchon, Kimchi, and others), in itself improbable in the signification required here, is not found either in post-biblical or in biblical Hebrew. טהר, like צהר, signifies first of all not purity, but brilliancy. Still the form טהר does not lie at the basis of it in this instance; for the reading found here just happens not to be טהרו, but מטּהרו; and the reading adopted by Norzi, Heidenheim, and Baer, as also by Nissel and others, so far as form is concerned is not distinct from it, viz., מטּהרו (miṭtŏharo), the character of the Sheb being determined by the analogy of the following (cf. בּסּערה, 2 Kings 2:1), which presupposes the principal form טהר (Bttcher, 386, cf. supra, 2:31, note). The personal tenor of Psalm 89:46 requires that it should be referred to the then reigning Davidic king, but not as dying before his time (Olshausen), but as becoming prematurely old by reason of the sorrowful experiences of his reign. The larger half of the kingdom has been wrested from him; Egypt and the neighbouring nations also threaten the half that remains to him; and instead of the kingly robe, shame completely covers him.

Psalm 89:49 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

where

Psalm 77:9,10 Has God forgotten to be gracious? has he in anger shut up his tender mercies? Selah...

Isaiah 63:7-15 I will mention the loving kindnesses of the LORD, and the praises of the LORD, according to all that the LORD has bestowed on us...

thou

Psalm 89:3,4,35 I have made a covenant with my chosen, I have sworn to David my servant...

Psalm 54:5 He shall reward evil to my enemies: cut them off in your truth.

Psalm 132:11,12 The LORD has sworn in truth to David; he will not turn from it; Of the fruit of your body will I set on your throne...

2 Samuel 3:9 So do God to Abner, and more also, except, as the LORD has sworn to David, even so I do to him;

2 Samuel 7:15 But my mercy shall not depart away from him, as I took it from Saul, whom I put away before you.

Isaiah 55:3 Incline your ear, and come to me: hear, and your soul shall live; and I will make an everlasting covenant with you...

Hebrews 7:21 (For those priests were made without an oath; but this with an oath by him that said to him, The Lord swore and will not repent...

Cross References
2 Samuel 7:15
but my steadfast love will not depart from him, as I took it from Saul, whom I put away from before you.

Psalm 54:5
He will return the evil to my enemies; in your faithfulness put an end to them.

Psalm 77:8
Has his steadfast love forever ceased? Are his promises at an end for all time?

Jeremiah 30:9
But they shall serve the LORD their God and David their king, whom I will raise up for them.

Ezekiel 34:23
And I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd.

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ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
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