Romans 1:17
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith for faith, as it is written, “The righteous shall live by faith.”

King James Bible
For therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith.

American Standard Version
For therein is revealed a righteousness of God from faith unto faith: as it is written, But the righteous shall live by faith.

Douay-Rheims Bible
For the justice of God is revealed therein, from faith unto faith, as it is written: The just man liveth by faith.

English Revised Version
For therein is revealed a righteousness of God by faith unto faith: as it is written, But the righteous shall live by faith.

Webster's Bible Translation
For in this is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith: as it is written, The just shall live by faith.

Weymouth New Testament
For in the Good News a righteousness which comes from God is being revealed, depending on faith and tending to produce faith; as the Scripture has it, "The righteous man shall live by faith."

Romans 1:17 Parallel
Commentary
Vincent's Word Studies

For therein is the righteousness of God revealed (δικαιοσύνη γὰρ Θεοῦ ἐν ἀυτῷ ἀποκαλύπτεται).

Rev., more correctly, therein is revealed a righteousness of God. The absence of the article denotes that a peculiar kind of righteousness is meant. This statement contains the subject of the epistle: Righteousness is by faith. The subject is not stated formally nor independently, but as a proof that the Gospel is a power, etc.

This word δικαιοσύνη righteousness, and its kindred words δίκαιος righteous, and δικαιόω to make righteous, play so important a part in this epistle that it is desirable to fix their meaning as accurately as possible.

Classical Usage. In the Greek classics there appears an eternal, divine, unwritten principle of right, dwelling in the human consciousness, shaping both the physical and the moral ordering of the world, and personified as Themis (Θέμις). This word is used as a common noun in the phrase θέμις ἐστὶ it is right (fundamentally and eternally), like the Latin fas est. Thus Homer, of Penelope mourning for Ulysses, θέμις ἐστὶ γυναικός it is the sacred obligation of the wife (founded in her natural relation to her husband, ordained of heaven) to mourn ("Odyssey," 14, 130). So Antigone appeals to the unwritten law against the barbarity of refusing burial to her brother.

"Nor did I deem thy edicts strong enough,

That thou, a mortal man, shouldst overpass

The unwritten laws of God that know not change."

Sophocles, "Antigone," 453-455.

See, also, "Odyssey," 14, 91; Aristophanes, "Clouds," 140; "Antigone," 880.

This divine ordering requires that men should be shown or pointed to that which is according to it - a definite circle of duties and obligations which constitute right (δίκη). Thus what is δίκαιος righteous, is properly the expression of the eternal Themis. While δίκη and θέμις are not to be distinguished as human and divine, δίκη has a more distinctively human, personal character, and comes into sharper definition. It introduces the distinction between absolute right and power. It imposes the recognition of a moral principle over against an absolutely constraining natural force. The conception of δίκη is strongly moral. Δίκαιος is right; δικαιοσύνη is rightness as characterizing the entire being of man.

There is a religious background to the pagan conception. In the Homeric poems morality stands in a relation, loose and undeveloped indeed, but none the less real, to religion. This appears in the use of the oath in compacts; in the fear of the wrath of heaven for omission of sacrifices; in regarding refusal of hospitality as an offense against Zeus, the patron of strangers and suppliants. Certain tribes which are fierce and uncivilized are nevertheless described as δίκαιοι righteous. "The characteristic stand-point of the Homeric ethics is that the spheres of law, of morals, and of religion are by no means separate, but lie side by side in undeveloped unity." (Nagelsbach).

In later Greek literature this conception advances, in some instances, far toward the christian ideal; as in the fourth book of Plato's "Laws," where he asserts that God holds in His hand the beginning, middle, and end of all things; that justice always follows Him, and punishes those who fall short of His laws. Those who would be dear to God must be like Him. Without holiness no man is accepted of God.

Nevertheless, however clearly the religious background and sanction of morality may be recognized, it is apparent that the basis of right is found, very largely, in established social usage. The word ethics points first to what is established by custom. While with Mr. Grote we must admit the peculiar emphasis on the individual in the Homeric poems, we cannot help observing a certain influence of social sentiment on morals. While there are cases like the suitors, Paris and Helen, where public opinion imposes no moral check, there are others where the force of public opinion is clearly visible, such as Penelope and Nausicaa. The Homeric view of homicide reveals no relation between moral sentiment and divine enactment. Murder is a breach of social law, a private and civil wrong, entailing no loss of character. Its penalty is a satisfaction to the feelings of friends, or a compensation for lost services.

Later, we find this social aspect of morality even more strongly emphasized. "The city becomes the central and paramount source of obligation. The great, impersonal authority called 'the Laws' stands out separately, both as guide and sanction, distinct from religious duty or private sympathy" (Grote). Socrates is charged with impiety because he does not believe in the gods of the state, and Socrates himself agrees that that man does right who obeys what the citizens have agreed should be done, and who refrains from what they forbid.

continued...

Romans 1:17 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For therein. See on

Romans 3:21 But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets;

from faith. See on

Romans 3:3 For what if some did not believe? shall their unbelief make the faith of God without effect?

The just.

Habakkuk 2:4 Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith.

John 3:36 He that believes on the Son has everlasting life: and he that believes not the Son shall not see life...

Galatians 3:11 But that no man is justified by the law in the sight of God, it is evident: for, The just shall live by faith.

Philippians 3:9 And be found in him, not having my own righteousness, which is of the law, but that which is through the faith of Christ...

Hebrews 10:38 Now the just shall live by faith: but if any man draw back, my soul shall have no pleasure in him.

Hebrews 11:6,7 But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that comes to God must believe that he is...

Cross References
Ezekiel 18:9
walks in my statutes, and keeps my rules by acting faithfully--he is righteous; he shall surely live, declares the Lord GOD.

Habakkuk 2:4
"Behold, his soul is puffed up; it is not upright within him, but the righteous shall live by his faith.

Romans 3:21
But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it--

Romans 3:22
the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. For there is no distinction:

Romans 9:30
What shall we say, then? That Gentiles who did not pursue righteousness have attained it, that is, a righteousness that is by faith;

Romans 10:3
For, being ignorant of the righteousness of God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God's righteousness.

2 Corinthians 3:9
For if there was glory in the ministry of condemnation, the ministry of righteousness must far exceed it in glory.

Jump to Previous
Depending Faith First God's Good Gospel Holy Live News Principle Produce Revealed Revelation Righteous Righteousness Scripture Tending Therein Writings Written
Jump to Next
Depending Faith First God's Good Gospel Holy Live News Principle Produce Revealed Revelation Righteous Righteousness Scripture Tending Therein Writings Written
Links
Romans 1:17 NIV
Romans 1:17 NLT
Romans 1:17 ESV
Romans 1:17 NASB
Romans 1:17 KJV

Romans 1:17 Bible Apps
Romans 1:17 Biblia Paralela
Romans 1:17 Chinese Bible
Romans 1:17 French Bible
Romans 1:17 German Bible

Bible Hub

ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Romans 1:16
Top of Page
Top of Page