Psalm 103:1
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
A Psalm of David. Bless the LORD, O my soul, And all that is within me, bless His holy name.

King James Bible
A Psalm of David. Bless the LORD, O my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy name.

Darby Bible Translation
{A Psalm of David.} Bless Jehovah, O my soul; and all that is within me, bless his holy name!

World English Bible
Praise Yahweh, my soul! All that is within me, praise his holy name!

Young's Literal Translation
By David. Bless, O my soul, Jehovah, And all my inward parts -- His Holy Name.

Psalm 103:1 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Bless the Lord, O my soul - The word "bless," as applied to God, means to praise, implying always a strong affection for him as well as a sense of gratitude. As used with reference to people, the word implies a "wish" that they may be blessed or happy, accompanied often with a prayer that they may be so. Such is the purport of the "blessing" addressed to a congregation of worshippers. Compare Numbers 6:23-27. The word "soul" here is equivalent to mind or heart: my mental and moral powers, as capable of understanding and appreciating his favors. The soul of man was "made" to praise and bless God; to enjoy his friendship; to delight in his favor; to contemplate his perfections. It can never be employed in a more appropriate or a more elevated act than when engaged in his praise.

And all that is within me ... - All my powers and faculties; all that can be employed in his praise: the heart, the will, the affections, the emotions. The idea is, that God is worthy of all the praise and adoration which the entire man can render. No one of his faculties or powers should be exempt from the duty and the privilege of praise.

Psalm 103:1 Parallel Commentaries

Library
What the Flowers Say.
(Children's Flower Service.) PSALM ciii. 15. "As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth." Children, have you ever heard of the language of flowers? Now, of course, we know that flowers cannot speak as we can. I wish they could. I think they would say such sweet things. But in one way flowers do talk to us. When you give them some water, or when God sends a shower of rain upon them, they give forth a sweet smell; I think that the flowers are speaking then, I think that they are saying, "thank
H. J. Wilmot-Buxton—The Life of Duty, a Year's Plain Sermons, v. 2

The Three Facts of Sin
"Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; Who healeth all thy diseases; Who redeemeth thy life from destruction."--Ps. ciii. 3, 4. THERE is one theological word which has found its way lately into nearly all the newer and finer literature of our country. It is not only one of the words of the literary world at present, it is perhaps the word. Its reality, its certain influence, its universality, have at last been recognised, and in spite of its theological name have forced it into a place which nothing
Henry Drummond—The Ideal Life

"For what the Law could not Do, in that it was Weak Though the Flesh, God Sending his Own Son,"
Rom. viii. 3.--"For what the law could not do, in that it was weak though the flesh, God sending his own Son," &c. Of all the works of God towards man, certainly there is none hath so much wonder in it, as the sending of his Son to become man; and so it requires the exactest attention in us. Let us gather our spirits to consider of this mystery,--not to pry into the secrets of it curiously, as if we had no more to do but to satisfy our understandings; but rather that we may see what this concerns
Hugh Binning—The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning

Why all Things Work for Good
1. The grand reason why all things work for good, is the near and dear interest which God has in His people. The Lord has made a covenant with them. "They shall be my people, and I will be their God" (Jer. xxxii. 38). By virtue of this compact, all things do, and must work, for good to them. "I am God, even thy God" (Psalm l. 7). This word, Thy God,' is the sweetest word in the Bible, it implies the best relations; and it is impossible there should be these relations between God and His people, and
Thomas Watson—A Divine Cordial

Cross References
2 Samuel 12:20
So David arose from the ground, washed, anointed himself, and changed his clothes; and he came into the house of the LORD and worshiped. Then he came to his own house, and when he requested, they set food before him and he ate.

Psalm 33:21
For our heart rejoices in Him, Because we trust in His holy name.

Psalm 104:1
Bless the LORD, O my soul! O LORD my God, You are very great; You are clothed with splendor and majesty,

Psalm 104:35
Let sinners be consumed from the earth And let the wicked be no more. Bless the LORD, O my soul. Praise the LORD!

Psalm 105:3
Glory in His holy name; Let the heart of those who seek the LORD be glad.

Psalm 145:21
My mouth will speak the praise of the LORD, And all flesh will bless His holy name forever and ever.

Psalm 146:1
Praise the LORD! Praise the LORD, O my soul!

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