Psalm 142:1
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
Maskil of David, when he was in the cave. A Prayer. I cry aloud with my voice to the LORD; I make supplication with my voice to the LORD.

King James Bible
Maschil of David; A Prayer when he was in the cave. I cried unto the LORD with my voice; with my voice unto the LORD did I make my supplication.

Darby Bible Translation
{An instruction of David; when he was in the cave: a prayer.} I cry unto Jehovah with my voice: with my voice unto Jehovah do I make supplication.

World English Bible
I cry with my voice to Yahweh. With my voice, I ask Yahweh for mercy.

Young's Literal Translation
An Instruction of David, a Prayer when he is in the cave. My voice is unto Jehovah, I cry, My voice is unto Jehovah, I entreat grace.

Psalm 142:1 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

I cried unto the Lord with my voice - See the notes at Psalm 3:4, where the language is the same. He uttered a loud and audible prayer, though he was alone. It was not a mental ejaculation, but he gave expression to his desires.

With my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication - See Psalm 30:8. The Hebrew word rendered "did make my supplication," means to implore favor or mercy. It denotes the language of petition and entreaty, not the language of claim.

Psalm 142:1 Parallel Commentaries

Library
The Ceaselessness of Prayer
The Ceaselessness of Prayer Prayer as Christian freedom, and prayer as Christian life--these are two points I would now expand. I. First, as to the moral freedom involved and achieved in prayer. Prayer has been described as religion in action. But that as it stands is not a sufficient definition of the prayer which lives on the Cross. The same thing might be said about the choicest forms of Christian service to humanity. It is true enough, and it may carry us far; but only if we become somewhat
P. T. Forsyth—The Soul of Prayer

Psalms
The piety of the Old Testament Church is reflected with more clearness and variety in the Psalter than in any other book of the Old Testament. It constitutes the response of the Church to the divine demands of prophecy, and, in a less degree, of law; or, rather, it expresses those emotions and aspirations of the universal heart which lie deeper than any formal demand. It is the speech of the soul face to face with God. Its words are as simple and unaffected as human words can be, for it is the genius
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
1 Samuel 22:1
So David departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adullam; and when his brothers and all his father's household heard of it, they went down there to him.

1 Samuel 24:3
He came to the sheepfolds on the way, where there was a cave; and Saul went in to relieve himself. Now David and his men were sitting in the inner recesses of the cave.

Psalm 24:3
Who may ascend into the hill of the LORD? And who may stand in His holy place?

Psalm 30:8
To You, O LORD, I called, And to the Lord I made supplication:

Psalm 77:1
For the choir director; according to Jeduthun. A Psalm of Asaph. My voice rises to God, and I will cry aloud; My voice rises to God, and He will hear me.

Jump to Previous
Aloud Cave Contemplation Cried Cry David Entreat Grace Hole Lift Maschil Maskil Mercy Prayer Sound Supplication Voice
Jump to Next
Aloud Cave Contemplation Cried Cry David Entreat Grace Hole Lift Maschil Maskil Mercy Prayer Sound Supplication Voice
Links
Psalm 142:1 NIV
Psalm 142:1 NLT
Psalm 142:1 ESV
Psalm 142:1 NASB
Psalm 142:1 KJV

Psalm 142:1 Bible Apps
Psalm 142:1 Biblia Paralela
Psalm 142:1 Chinese Bible
Psalm 142:1 French Bible
Psalm 142:1 German Bible

Psalm 142:1 Commentaries

Bible Hub
Psalm 141:10
Top of Page
Top of Page