Song of Solomon 7:2
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
"Your navel is like a round goblet Which never lacks mixed wine; Your belly is like a heap of wheat Fenced about with lilies.

King James Bible
Thy navel is like a round goblet, which wanteth not liquor: thy belly is like an heap of wheat set about with lilies.

Darby Bible Translation
Thy navel is a round goblet, which wanteth not mixed wine; Thy belly a heap of wheat, set about with lilies;

World English Bible
Your body is like a round goblet, no mixed wine is wanting. Your waist is like a heap of wheat, set about with lilies.

Young's Literal Translation
Thy waist is a basin of roundness, It lacketh not the mixture, Thy body a heap of wheat, fenced with lilies,

Song of Solomon 7:2 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Or, Thy lap is like a moon-shaped bowl where mixed wine faileth not." The wine in the bowl rising to the brim adds to the beauty of the vessel, and gives a more pleasing image to the eye. Some interpret, "thy girdle is like a moon-shaped bowl," or "bears a moon-shaped ornament" (compare Isaiah 3:18).

Set about with lilies - The contrast is one of colors, the flowers, it may be, representing the purple of the robe. "The heap of wheat is not seen because covered by the lilies."

Song of Solomon 7:2 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Christ Inviting, and the Church Answering the Invitation. Ss 2:14-17.
Christ inviting, and the church answering the invitation. SS 2:14-17. [Hark! the Redeemer from on high Sweetly invites his fav'rites nigh; From caves of darkness and of doubt, He gently speaks, and calls us out. "My dove, who hidest in the rock, Thine heart almost with sorrow broke, Lift up thy face, forget thy fear, And let thy voice delight mine ear. "Thy voice to me sounds ever sweet; My graces in thy count'nance meet; Though the vain world thy face despise, 'Tis bright and comely in mine eyes."
Isaac Watts—The Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts

The Man and the Book.
In this and the following lectures I attempt an account and estimate of the Prophet Jeremiah, of his life and teaching, and of the Book which contains them--but especially of the man himself, his personality and his tempers (there were more than one), his religious experience and its achievements, with the various high styles of their expression; as well as his influence on the subsequent religion of his people. It has often been asserted that in Jeremiah's ministry more than in any other of the
George Adam Smith—Jeremiah

Song of Solomon 7:1
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