1 Kings 10:28
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Solomon's horses were imported from Egypt and from Kue --the royal merchants purchased them from Kue at the current price.

King James Bible
And Solomon had horses brought out of Egypt, and linen yarn: the king's merchants received the linen yarn at a price.

Darby Bible Translation
And the exportation of horses that Solomon had was from Egypt: a caravan of the king's merchants fetched a drove [of horses], at a price.

World English Bible
The horses which Solomon had were brought out of Egypt; and the king's merchants received them in droves, each drove at a price.

Young's Literal Translation
And the outgoing of the horses that king Solomon hath is from Egypt, and from Keveh; merchants of the king take from Keveh at a price;

1 Kings 10:28 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

Horses brought out of Egypt - It is thought that the first people who used horses in war were the Egyptians; and it is well known that the nations who knew the use of this creature in battle had greatly the advantage of those who did not. God had absolutely prohibited horses to be imported or used; but in many things Solomon paid little attention to the Divine command.

And linen yarn - The original word, מקוה mikveh, is hard to be understood, if it be not indeed a corruption.

The versions are all puzzled with it: the Vulgate and Septuagint make it a proper name: "And Solomon had horses brought out of Egypt, and from Coa, or Tekoa." Some think it signifies a tribute, thus Bochart: "They brought horses to Solomon out of Egypt; and as to the tribute, the farmers of this prince received it at a price." They farmed the tribute, gave so much annually for it, taking the different kinds to themselves, and giving a round sum for the whole.

Some suppose that Mikveh signifies the string or cord by which one horse's head is tied to the tail of another; and that the meaning is, Solomon brought droves of horses, thus tied, out of Egypt.

Rabbi Solomon Jarchi, in his comment on the parallel place, 2 Chronicles 1:14, says that מקוה mikveh signifies a collection or drove of horses, or what the Germans call stutte, a stud. He observes on that place, "That he has heard that there was a company of merchants in Egypt, who bought horses from the Egyptians at a certain price, on condition that no person should be permitted to bring a horse out of Egypt but through them." Houbigant supposes the place to be corrupt, and that for מקוה mikveh we should read מרכבה mercabah, chariots: "And Solomon had horses brought out of Egypt, and chariots; and the king's merchants received the chariots at a price: and a chariot came up and went out of Egypt for six hundred shekels of silver," etc. This makes a very good and consistent sense; but none of the versions acknowledged it, nor is there any various reading here in any of the MSS. yet collated.

If we understand it of thread, it may refer to the byssus or fine flax for which Egypt was famous; but I do not see on what authority we translate it linen thread. Bochart's opinion appears to me the most probable, as the text now stands; but the charge contended for by Houbigant makes the text far more simple and intelligible.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Solomon [heb] the going forth of the horses which was Solomon's
horse brought

Deuteronomy 17:16 But he shall not multiply horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to the end that he should multiply horses...

2 Chronicles 1:16,17 And Solomon had horses brought out of Egypt, and linen yarn: the king's merchants received the linen yarn at a price...

2 Chronicles 9:28 And they brought to Solomon horses out of Egypt, and out of all lands.

Isaiah 31:1-3 Woe to them that go down to Egypt for help; and stay on horses, and trust in chariots, because they are many; and in horsemen...

Isaiah 36:9 How then will you turn away the face of one captain of the least of my master's servants...

and linen yarn

Genesis 41:42 And Pharaoh took off his ring from his hand, and put it on Joseph's hand, and arrayed him in clothing of fine linen...

Proverbs 7:16 I have decked my bed with coverings of tapestry, with carved works, with fine linen of Egypt.

Isaiah 19:9 Moreover they that work in fine flax, and they that weave networks, shall be confounded.

Ezekiel 27:7 Fine linen with broidered work from Egypt was that which you spread forth to be your sail...

Library
Coming to the King.
"And King Solomon gave unto the Queen of Sheba all her desire, whatsoever she asked, beside that which Solomon gave her of his royal bounty."--1 Kings x. 13. The beautiful history recorded in the chapter from which the above words are quoted is deeply instructive to those who have learned to recognise CHRIST in the Scriptures. The reference to this narrative by our LORD Himself was surely designed to draw our attention to it, and gives it an added interest. The blessings, too, received by the Queen
J. Hudson Taylor—A Ribband of Blue

Of the Weight of Government; and that all Manner of Adversity is to be Despised, and Prosperity Feared.
So much, then, have we briefly said, to shew how great is the weight of government, lest whosoever is unequal to sacred offices of government should dare to profane them, and through lust of pre-eminence undertake a leadership of perdition. For hence it is that James affectionately deters us, saying, Be not made many masters, my brethren (James iii. 1). Hence the Mediator between God and man Himself--He who, transcending the knowledge and understanding even of supernal spirits, reigns in heaven
Leo the Great—Writings of Leo the Great

Kings
The book[1] of Kings is strikingly unlike any modern historical narrative. Its comparative brevity, its curious perspective, and-with some brilliant exceptions--its relative monotony, are obvious to the most cursory perusal, and to understand these things is, in large measure, to understand the book. It covers a period of no less than four centuries. Beginning with the death of David and the accession of Solomon (1 Kings i., ii.) it traverses his reign with considerable fulness (1 Kings iii.-xi.),
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
Deuteronomy 17:16
The king, moreover, must not acquire great numbers of horses for himself or make the people return to Egypt to get more of them, for the LORD has told you, "You are not to go back that way again."

2 Chronicles 1:16
Solomon's horses were imported from Egypt and from Kue --the royal merchants purchased them from Kue at the current price.

2 Chronicles 9:28
Solomon's horses were imported from Egypt and from all other countries.

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Buying Caravan Drove Droves Egypt Exportation Fetched Horses Import Imported King's Kue Ku'e Linen Merchants Outgoing Price Procured Received Royal Solomon Solomon's Traders Yarn
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Buying Caravan Drove Droves Egypt Exportation Fetched Horses Import Imported King's Kue Ku'e Linen Merchants Outgoing Price Procured Received Royal Solomon Solomon's Traders Yarn
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