1 Samuel 25:7
Parallel Verses
New Living Translation
I am told that it is sheep-shearing time. While your shepherds stayed among us near Carmel, we never harmed them, and nothing was ever stolen from them.

King James Bible
And now I have heard that thou hast shearers: now thy shepherds which were with us, we hurt them not, neither was there ought missing unto them, all the while they were in Carmel.

Darby Bible Translation
And now I have heard that thou hast shearers; now thy shepherds who were with us, we hurt them not, neither was there aught missed by them, all the while they were in Carmel.

World English Bible
Now I have heard that you have shearers. Your shepherds have now been with us, and we did them no hurt, neither was there anything missing to them, all the while they were in Carmel.

Young's Literal Translation
and, now, I have heard that thou hast shearers; now, the shepherds whom thou hast have been with us, we have not put them to shame, nor hath anything been looked after by them, all the days of their being in Carmel.

1 Samuel 25:7 Parallel
Commentary
Wesley's Notes on the Bible

25:7 We hurt not - This considering the licentiousness of soldiers, and the necessities David and his men were exposed to, was no small favour, which Nabal was bound both in justice, and gratitude, and prudence to requite.

1 Samuel 25:7 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Barzillai
BY REV. GEORGE MILLIGAN, M.A., D.D. "There is nothing," says Socrates to Cephalus in the Republic, "I like better than conversing with aged men. For I regard them as travellers who have gone a journey which I too may have to go, and of whom it is right to learn the character of the way, whether it is rugged or difficult, or smooth and easy" (p. 328 E.). It is to such an aged traveller that we are introduced in the person of Barzillai the Gileadite. And though he is one of the lesser-known characters
George Milligan—Men of the Bible; Some Lesser-Known

The Section Chap. I. -iii.
The question which here above all engages our attention, and requires to be answered, is this: Whether that which is reported in these chapters did, or did not, actually and outwardly take place. The history of the inquiries connected with this question is found most fully in Marckius's "Diatribe de uxore fornicationum," Leyden, 1696, reprinted in the Commentary on the Minor Prophets by the same author. The various views may be divided into three classes. 1. It is maintained by very many interpreters,
Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg—Christology of the Old Testament

The Promise in 2 Samuel, Chap. vii.
The Messianic prophecy, as we have seen, began at a time long anterior to that of David. Even in Genesis, we perceived [Pg 131] it, increasing more and more in distinctness. There is at first only the general promise that the seed of the woman should obtain the victory over the kingdom of the evil one;--then, that the salvation should come through the descendants of Shem;--then, from among them Abraham is marked out,--of his sons, Isaac,--from among his sons, Jacob,--and from among the twelve sons
Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg—Christology of the Old Testament

Samuel
Alike from the literary and the historical point of view, the book[1] of Samuel stands midway between the book of Judges and the book of Kings. As we have already seen, the Deuteronomic book of Judges in all probability ran into Samuel and ended in ch. xii.; while the story of David, begun in Samuel, embraces the first two chapters of the first book of Kings. The book of Samuel is not very happily named, as much of it is devoted to Saul and the greater part to David; yet it is not altogether inappropriate,
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
1 Samuel 25:15
These men have been very good to us, and we never suffered any harm from them. Nothing was stolen from us the whole time they were with us.

1 Samuel 25:21
David had just been saying, "A lot of good it did to help this fellow. We protected his flocks in the wilderness, and nothing he owned was lost or stolen. But he has repaid me evil for good.

2 Samuel 13:23
Two years later, when Absalom's sheep were being sheared at Baal-hazor near Ephraim, Absalom invited all the king's sons to come to a feast.

2 Samuel 13:24
He went to the king and said, "My sheep-shearers are now at work. Would the king and his servants please come to celebrate the occasion with me?"

Jump to Previous
Aught Carmel Evil Harm Hear Heard Hurt Insulted Keepers Missed Missing Mistreat Ought Shame Shearers Sheep Shepherds Theirs Time Whole Wool-Cutters Word
Jump to Next
Aught Carmel Evil Harm Hear Heard Hurt Insulted Keepers Missed Missing Mistreat Ought Shame Shearers Sheep Shepherds Theirs Time Whole Wool-Cutters Word
Links
1 Samuel 25:7 NIV
1 Samuel 25:7 NLT
1 Samuel 25:7 ESV
1 Samuel 25:7 NASB
1 Samuel 25:7 KJV

1 Samuel 25:7 Bible Apps
1 Samuel 25:7 Biblia Paralela
1 Samuel 25:7 Chinese Bible
1 Samuel 25:7 French Bible
1 Samuel 25:7 German Bible

1 Samuel 25:7 Commentaries

Bible Hub
1 Samuel 25:6
Top of Page
Top of Page