Isaiah 2:3
And many peoples will come and say, "Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the house of the God of Jacob. He will teach us His ways so that we may walk in His paths." For the law will go forth from Zion, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.
Sermons
Desire for Spiritual InstructionR. Boyle.Isaiah 2:3
Let Us Go UpIsaiah 2:3
Many PeopleA. B. Davidson, LL. D.Isaiah 2:3
Real Religious RevivalW.M. Statham Isaiah 2:3
The Attractions of the Gospel ChurchW. Clarkson Isaiah 2:3
The Ways of GodR. Macculloch.Isaiah 2:3
Walking in God's PathsR. Macculloch.Isaiah 2:3
The Golden AgeE. Johnson Isaiah 2:1-4
The Promised Future: a Missionary SermonW. Clarkson Isaiah 2:1-5
A Vision of the Latter Day GloriesIsaiah 2:2-4
All Nations Shall Flow unto ItIsaiah 2:2-4
An Epitome of Isaiah's VisionSir E. Strachey, Bart.Isaiah 2:2-4
Isaiah's Description of the Last DaysSir E. Strachey, Bart.Isaiah 2:2-4
Isaiah's Wideness of ViewJ. Parker, D. D.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Church of the FutureWashington Gladden, D. D.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Church of the Future -- Goethe and IsaiahWashington Gladden, D. D.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Church's Visibility and GloryJ. Mede, B. D.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Future Glory and Amplitude of the ChurchS. Ramsey, M. A.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Glorious Exaltation and Enlargement of ChurchJ. Mede, B. D.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Magnet Which Draws the NationsBp. M. Simpson, D. D.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Mountain of the Lord's HouseRichard Watson.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Mountain of the Lord's HouseAnon.Isaiah 2:2-4
The Supremacy of Mount ZionIsaiah 2:2-4
Many people shall go and say, Come ye, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob. Here is the tide of national feeling, no longer on the ebb, but on the flow. God is "to teach them his ways, and they are to walk in his paths;" for they have found out that pleasure gained by sin is peace bartered. Elevation of the truest kind is to be theirs now. This is the image of their uplifted state. They are to go up to the mountain of the Lord's house - the consecrated height of holiness and peace.

I. THERE IS SPONTANEITY OF LIFE. "Come, let us go." It is no mere fashion, or custom, or compulsion of obedience. Life always says, "Come." I read delight here. For what we enjoy we invite others to see. When we ascend to the mountain-top, and see the winding river, like a streak of silver, and the village-dotted plains, we cry "Come!" to others, that they too may delight in the loveliness of the scene. So an earnest Christian not only says "Come!" because of the urgency of the salvation, but also because of the beauty and blessedness of religion. "Oh taste and see," he says, "that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in him."

II. THERE IS SACRED FELLOWSHIP. "Let us go up." For religion is intensified in its experiences by mutual faith and joy. The interaction of mind on mind and heart upon heart in a great congregation is wonderful. "Let us go up." And beautiful were those spectacles in Hebrew history, when the pilgrims went to tabernacle or temple. "Thither the tribes go up," The festal caravans met each other from distant parts, as they merged at last into one common road to time-beloved Jerusalem. At the Feasts of Pentecost and Passover, as in the days of our Savior, the interest felt in these upgoings to Jerusalem was both human and Divine. Old friends met again, whilst youths and maidens set eyes for the first time on the city and temple of their fathers. On their way they sang the songs of Zion, till in noblest worship the gathered tribes lifted up their praise to the Lord God of Israel.

III. THERE IS SUBLIME PROPHECY. "Many shall go," Yes, and in these Christian days, Greek and Jew, bond and flee, have been united in one common song of deliverance. Missionary societies have founded Churches and schools on well-nigh every shore. "Many shall corns." Verily, unto Christ shall the gathering of the people be. "All nations shall call him blessed." How verified the words have been! "For out of Zion shall go forth the Law, and the Word of the Lord from Jerusalem." - W.M.S.







Come ye, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord.
For "people" read "peoples." So ver. 4.

(A. B. Davidson, LL. D.)

What I intend is to make use of the words as they express a sincere desire in many people of being better informed in the mind and will of God, by some particular revelation from Himself than they could be by the mere natural light of their own minds, reflecting only upon the general works of creation and providence.

I. EVERY RATIONAL MAN, WHO BELIEVES A GOD AND A PROVIDENCE GOVERNING THE WORLD, IS UNDER A NATURAL OBLIGATION TO INQUIRE WHETHER GOD HAS MADE ANY PARTICULAR REVELATION OF HIS WILL TO MEN, WHICH THEY ARE ANY WAY CONCERNED TO TAKE NOTICE OF.

II. WHOEVER SERIOUSLY MAKES THIS INQUIRY, WILL FIND IT REASONABLE TO CONCLUDE THAT SOME REVELATION MAY JUSTLY BE EXPECTED FROM GOD, CONSIDERING THE GENERAL STATE OF MANKIND.

1. In the nature of things, there is no impossibility that God should make a particular revelation of His will to men. That God should communicate His will to men in a particular manner, implies nothing contradictory, either to the nature of man or God. For if we believe that God is the Maker of mankind, and that from Him they received their reason and understanding, then it is unreasonable to suppose that the mind of man is incapable of receiving any impression of revelation or instruction from the Supreme mind, only because that Supreme mind is of an invisible nature. And it is yet much more unreasonable to suppose any incapacity in the Divine Being, of making such discovery of His will to the mind of man, as His wisdom sees fit; for this would, in effect, be to deny the perfection of His nature, and to make him a Being not acting freely but by necessity, without liberty or choice and this in the end comes to the same thing as denying His Being altogether.

2. Considering our natural notions of the goodness of God, there is no reason to think it incredible that He should at some time or other make such discovery of His will.

3. Considering the general condition of mankind, such revelation is by no means unnecessary.(1) It is evident, that there is a surprising corruption in human nature; that the generality of men have hardly ever attended duly, at any time, to the natural dictates of their own reason. But much the greater part have shewn themselves more prone to extinguish than to improve the light of reason.(2) Suppose they had really known the true state of their own case, yet the true cure for it was more than human power or skill could effect. Some of them had recourse to philosophy. But the disease was too inveterate and epidemical to be cured by so weak a medicine.(3) Supposing the philosophers had been really designed to reform the morals and religion of mankind, they were not sufficiently qualified for such an undertaking, because they them. selves were ignorant of many things necessary for it. As they knew not the first cause of the corruption of human nature, so they could know nothing of God's design in suffering it, nor of the scheme and order of His providence, by which He designed to conduct mankind out of it, into a more perfect and happy state than that from which they had fallen.(4) In matters of religion, which, naturally, have the greatest influence over the mind of man, and which therefore ought to be under the best and truest direction of all others, they were still more deficient than in anything else. When mankind had once generally fallen from the worship of the one true God, they sunk, by degrees, into the most brutal superstition and idolatry.(5) Divers of the wisest philosophers did themselves confess that they wanted a Divine revelation to set them right, even in matters which were of the utmost consequence.(6) Such men as now think that no revelation was ever necessary, but that the want of it might always have been sufficiently supplied by the use of human reason alone, do not state the matter fairly; because they confound part of that light which we insensibly receive by the revelation of the Gospel, with that light of nature which men had before it: that is, they do not distinguish between those notions which the mere heathen world were in possession of before, and those which they attained to after the preaching of the Gospel.

III. IF THIS BE SO, THEN IT IS EVERY MAN'S DUTY TO USE ALL THE PROPER MEANS HE CAN TO FIND OUT WHAT IS TRUE REVELATION AND WHAT IS ONLY PRETENDED.

(R. Boyle.)

Those that are entering into covenant and communion with God themselves should bring as many as they can along with them.

( M. Henry.)

He will teach us of His ways
By the ways of God may be meant —

1. His purposes and counsels, so far as are proper and necessary for His servants to be acquainted with, in order to promote their happiness and salvation.

2. His providential dispensations, so far as is consistent with their duty and interest to know them. That they may understand the loving kindness of the Lord.

3. The ministration of His Spirit and the way of salvation, by which the manifold wisdom of Jehovah is admirably displayed. These are, with great propriety, called the ways of God, as He points them out to us in His Word, and as they are intended to conduct to the enjoyment of Him in the land of everlasting upright. ness.

(R. Macculloch.)

And we will walk in His paths
The resolution before us —

1. Plainly implies a free choice of the precepts of the Gospel, in preference to all other ways, and in opposition to every kind of compulsion whatever.

2. It includes a fixed purpose of heart, a firm determination, to cleave unto the Lord, notwithstanding every difficulty and discouragement that may lie in the way.

3. And as walking is an uniform, progressive motion, it comprehends a constant, persevering progress in the good ways of the Lord, wherein they are instructed.

(R. Macculloch.)

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