Psalm 108:4
For your mercy is great above the heavens: and your truth reaches to the clouds.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
108:1-13 We may usefully select passages from different psalms, as here, Ps 57; 60, to help our devotions, and enliven our gratitude. When the heart is firm in faith and love, the tongue, being employed in grateful praises, is our glory. Every gift of the Lord honours and profits the possessor, as it is employed in God's service and to his glory. Believers may pray with assured faith and hope, for all the blessings of salvation; which are secured to them by the faithful promise and covenant of God. Then let them expect from him help in every trouble, and victory in every conflict. Whatever we do, whatever we gain, God must have all the glory. Lord, visit all our souls with this salvation, with this favour which thou bearest to thy chosen people.For thy mercy ... - This is taken from Psalm 57:10. The only change is in the expression "above the heavens," instead of "unto the heavens." The sense is essentially the same. The particular idea here, if it differs at all from the expression in Psalm 57:1-11, is, that the mercy of God seems to "descend" from heaven upon man, or "comes down" from on high. PSALM 108

Ps 108:1-13. This Psalm is composed of Ps 108:1-5 of Ps 57:7-11; and Ps 108:6-12 of Ps 60:5-12. The varieties are verbal and trivial, except that in Ps 108:9, "over Philistia will I triumph," differs from Ps 60:8, the interpretation of which it confirms. Its altogether triumphant tone may intimate that it was prepared by David, omitting the plaintive portions of the other Psalms, as commemorative of God's favor in the victories of His people.

No text from Poole on this verse. For thy mercy is great above the heavens,..... It is in Psalm 57:10, "thy mercy is great unto the heavens". See Gill on Psalm 57:10. For thy mercy is great above the heavens: and thy truth reacheth unto the clouds.
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
4. For thy lovingkindness is great above the heavens,

And thy truth (reacheth) unto the skies.

This verse gives the reason for the praises which he purposes to offer. Once more God’s lovingkindness and truth had been attested by the deliverance of Israel from exile. Cp. Psalm 98:3. The change of ‘unto the heavens’ into ‘above the heavens’ is a loss to the sense, making the second line an anticlimax.Verse 4. - For thy mercy is great above the heavens: and thy truth reacheth unto the clouds. Identical with Psalm 57:10, with the exception of one preposition, which occurs only in some manuscripts. But is also came to pass that it went ill with them, inasmuch as their flourishing prosperous condition drew down upon them the envy of the powerful and tyrannical; nevertheless God put an end to tyranny, and always brought His people again to honour and strength. Hitzig is of opinion that Psalm 107:39 goes back into the time when things were different with those who, according to Psalm 107:36-38, had thriven. The modus consecutivus is sometimes used thus retrospectively (vid., Isaiah 37:5); here, however, the symmetry of the continuation from Psalm 107:36-38, and the change which is expressed in Psalm 107:39 in comparison with Psalm 107:38, require an actual consecution in that which is narrated. They became few and came down, were reduced (שׁחח, cf. Proverbs 14:19 : to come to ruin, or to be overthrown), a coarctatione malitiae et maeroris. עצר is the restraint of despotic rule, רעה the evil they had to suffer under such restraint, and רגון sorrow, which consumed their life. מעצר has Tarcha and רעה Munach (instead of Mercha and Mugrash, vid., Accentuationssystem, xviii. 2). There is no reason for departing from this interpunction and rendering: "through tyranny, evil, and sorrow." What is stiff and awkward in the progress of the description arises from the fact that Psalm 107:40 is borrowed from Job 12:21, Job 12:24, and that the poet is not willing to make any change in these sublime words. The version shows how we think the relation of the clauses is to be apprehended. Whilst He pours out His wrath upon tyrants in the contempt of men that comes upon them, and makes them fugitives who lose themselves in the terrible waste, He raises the needy and those hitherto despised and ill-treated on high out of the depth of their affliction, and makes families like a flock, i.e., makes their families so increase, that they come to have the appearance of a merrily gamboling and numerous flock. Just as this figure points back to Job 21:11, so Psalm 107:42 is made up out of Job 22:19; Job 5:16. The sight of this act of recognition on the part of God of those who have been wrongfully oppressed gives joy to the upright, and all roguery (עולה, vid., Psalm 92:16) has its mouth closed, i.e., its boastful insolence is once for all put to silence. In Psalm 107:43 the poet makes the strains of his Psalm die away after the example of Hosea, Hosea 14:10 [9], in the nota bene expressed after the manner of a question: Who is wise - he will or let him keep this, i.e., bear it well in mind. The transition to the justice together with a change of number is rendered natural by the fact that מי חכם, as in Hos. loc. cit. (cf. Jeremiah 9:11; Esther 5:6, and without Waw apod. Judges 7:3; Proverbs 9:4, Proverbs 9:16), is equivalent to quisquis sapeins est. חסדי ה (חסדי) are the manifestations of mercy or loving-kindness in which God's ever-enduring mercy unfolds itself in history. He who is wise has a good memory for and a clear understanding of this.
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