Psalm 65:7
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
who stills the roaring of the seas, the roaring of their waves, the tumult of the peoples,

King James Bible
Which stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

American Standard Version
Who stilleth the roaring of the seas, The roaring of their waves, And the tumult of the peoples.

Douay-Rheims Bible
who troublest the depth of the sea, the noise of its waves. The Gentiles shall be troubled,

English Revised Version
Which stilleth the roaring of the seas, the roaring of their waves, and the tumult of the peoples.

Webster's Bible Translation
Who stilleth the noise of the seas, the noise of their waves, and the tumult of the people.

Psalm 65:7 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The praise of God on account of the mercy with which He rules out of Zion. The lxx renders σοὶ πρέπει ὕμνος, but דּומיּה, tibi par est, h. e. convenit laus (Ewald), is not a usage of the language (cf. Psalm 33:1; Jeremiah 10:7). דּמיּה signifies, according to Psalm 22:3, silence, and as an ethical notion, resignation, Psalm 62:2. According to the position of the words it looks like the subject, and תּהלּה like the predicate. The accents at least (Illuj, Shalsheleth) assume the relationship of the one word to the other to be that of predicate and subject; consequently it is not: To Thee belongeth resignation, praise (Hengstenberg), but: To Thee is resignation praise, i.e., resignation is (given or presented) to Thee as praise. Hitzig obtains the same meaning by an alteration of the text: לך דמיה תהלּל; but opposed to this is the fact that הלּל ל is not found anywhere in the Psalter, but only in the writings of the chronicler. And since it is clear that the words לך תהלה belong together (Psalm 40:4), the poet had no need to fear any ambiguity when he inserted dmyh between them as that which is given to God as praise in Zion. What is intended is that submission or resignation to God which gives up its cause to God and allows Him to act on its behalf, renouncing all impatient meddling and interference (Exodus 14:14). The second member of the sentence affirms that this praise of pious resignation does not remain unanswered. Just as God in Zion is praised by prayer which resigns our own will silently to His, so also to Him are vows paid when He fulfils such prayer. That the answers to prayer are evidently thought of in connection with this, we see from Psalm 65:3, where God is addressed as the "Hearer or Answerer of prayer." To Him as being the Hearer and Answerer of prayer all flesh comes, and in fact, as עדיך implies (cf. Isaiah 45:24), without finding help anywhere else, it clear a way for itself until it gets to Him; i.e., men, absolutely dependent, impotent in themselves and helpless, both collectively and individually (those only excepted who are determined to perish or despair), flee to Him as their final refuge and help. Before all else it is the prayer for the forgiveness of sin which He graciously answers. The perfect in Psalm 65:4 is followed by the future in Psalm 65:4. The former, in accordance with the sense, forms a hypothetical protasis: granted that the instances of faults have been too powerful for me, i.e., (cf. Genesis 4:13) an intolerable burden to me, our transgressions are expiated by Thee (who alone canst and also art willing to do it). דּברי is not less significant than in Psalm 35:20; Psalm 105:27; Psalm 145:5, cf. 1 Samuel 10:2; 2 Samuel 11:18.: it separates the general fact into its separate instances and circumstances. How blessed therefore is the lot of that man whom (supply אשׁר) God chooses and brings near, i.e., removes into His vicinity, that he may inhabit His courts (future with the force of a clause expressing a purpose, as e.g., in Job 30:28, which see), i.e., that there, where He sits enthroned and reveals Himself, he may have his true home and be as if at home (vid., Psalm 15:1)! The congregation gathered around Zion is esteemed worthy of this distinction among the nations of the earth; it therefore encourages itself in the blessed consciousness of this its privilege flowing from free grace (בחר), to enjoy in full draughts (שּבע with בּ as in Psalm 103:5) the abundant goodness or blessing (טוּב) of God's house, of the holy (ἅγιον) of His temple, i.e., of His holy temple (קדשׁ as in Psalm 46:5, cf. Isaiah 57:15). For for all that God's grace offers us we can give Him no better thanks than to hunger and thirst after it, and satisfy our poor soul therewith.

Psalm 65:7 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Which

Psalm 89:9 You rule the raging of the sea: when the waves thereof arise, you still them.

Psalm 107:29 He makes the storm a calm, so that the waves thereof are still.

Jonah 1:4,15 But the LORD sent out a great wind into the sea, and there was a mighty tempest in the sea, so that the ship was like to be broken...

Matthew 8:26,27 And he said to them, Why are you fearful, O you of little faith? Then he arose, and rebuked the winds and the sea...

noise

Psalm 93:3,4 The floods have lifted up, O LORD, the floods have lifted up their voice; the floods lift up their waves...

Psalm 104:6-9 You covered it with the deep as with a garment: the waters stood above the mountains...

Job 38:8-11 Or who shut up the sea with doors, when it broke forth, as if it had issued out of the womb...

tumult

Psalm 2:1-4 Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing...

Psalm 76:10 Surely the wrath of man shall praise you: the remainder of wrath shall you restrain.

Isaiah 17:12,13 Woe to the multitude of many people, which make a noise like the noise of the seas; and to the rushing of nations...

John 18:6 As soon then as he had said to them, I am he, they went backward, and fell to the ground.

Cross References
Matthew 8:26
And he said to them, "Why are you afraid, O you of little faith?" Then he rose and rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was a great calm.

Mark 4:39
And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, "Peace! Be still!" And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm.

Psalm 2:1
Why do the nations rage and the peoples plot in vain?

Psalm 74:23
Do not forget the clamor of your foes, the uproar of those who rise against you, which goes up continually!

Psalm 89:9
You rule the raging of the sea; when its waves rise, you still them.

Psalm 93:3
The floods have lifted up, O LORD, the floods have lifted up their voice; the floods lift up their roaring.

Psalm 93:4
Mightier than the thunders of many waters, mightier than the waves of the sea, the LORD on high is mighty!

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ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
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