Psalm 79:11
Parallel Verses
King James Version
Let the sighing of the prisoner come before thee; according to the greatness of thy power preserve thou those that are appointed to die;

Darby Bible Translation
Let the groaning of the prisoner come before thee; according to the greatness of thine arm, preserve those that are appointed to die;

World English Bible
Let the sighing of the prisoner come before you. According to the greatness of your power, preserve those who are sentenced to death.

Young's Literal Translation
Let the groaning of the prisoner come in before Thee, According to the greatness of Thine arm, Leave Thou the sons of death.

Psalm 79:11 Parallel
Commentary
King James Translators' Notes

thy...: Heb. thine arm

preserve...: Heb. reserve the children of death

Geneva Study Bible

Let the sighing of the {i} prisoner come before thee; according to the greatness of thy power preserve thou {k} those that are appointed to die;

(i) Who though in respect to God they were justly punished for their sins, yet in consideration of their cause were unjustly murdered.

(k) Who were captives among their enemies and could look for nothing but death.Psalm 79:11 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Period ii. The Church from the Permanent Division of the Empire Until the Collapse of the Western Empire and the First Schism Between the East and the West, or Until About A. D. 500
In the second period of the history of the Church under the Christian Empire, the Church, although existing in two divisions of the Empire and experiencing very different political fortunes, may still be regarded as forming a whole. The theological controversies distracting the Church, although different in the two halves of the Graeco-Roman world, were felt to some extent in both divisions of the Empire and not merely in the one in which they were principally fought out; and in the condemnation
Joseph Cullen Ayer Jr., Ph.D.—A Source Book for Ancient Church History

The Formation of the Old Testament Canon
[Sidenote: Israel's literature at the beginning of the fourth century before Christ] Could we have studied the scriptures of the Israelitish race about 400 B.C., we should have classified them under four great divisions: (1) The prophetic writings, represented by the combined early Judean, Ephraimite, and late prophetic or Deuteronomic narratives, and their continuation in Samuel and Kings, together with the earlier and exilic prophecies; (2) the legal, represented by the majority of the Old Testament
Charles Foster Kent—The Origin & Permanent Value of the Old Testament

A Summary of the Christian Life. Of Self-Denial.
The divisions of the chapter are,--I. The rule which permits us not to go astray in the study of righteousness, requires two things, viz., that man, abandoning his own will, devote himself entirely to the service of God; whence it follows, that we must seek not our own things, but the things of God, sec. 1, 2. II. A description of this renovation or Christian life taken from the Epistle to Titus, and accurately explained under certain special heads, sec. 3 to end. 1. ALTHOUGH the Law of God contains
Archpriest John Iliytch Sergieff—On the Christian Life

Psalm 79:10
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