Psalm 64:1
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
For the choir director. A Psalm of David. Hear my voice, O God, in my complaint; Preserve my life from dread of the enemy.

King James Bible
To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David. Hear my voice, O God, in my prayer: preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

Darby Bible Translation
{To the chief Musician. A Psalm of David.} Hear, O God, my voice in my plaint; preserve my life from fear of the enemy:

World English Bible
Hear my voice, God, in my complaint. Preserve my life from fear of the enemy.

Young's Literal Translation
To the Overseer. -- A Psalm of David. Hear, O God, my voice, in my meditation, From the fear of an enemy Thou keepest my life,

Psalm 64:1 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Hear my voice, O God, in my prayer - The use of the word voice here would seem to imply that this was audible prayer, or that, though alone, he gave utterance to his petitions aloud. We have this same use of the word often in the Psalms, making it probable that even private prayers were uttered in an audible manner. In most cases, when there is no danger of being overheard, or of its being construed as ostentation or Pharisaism, this is favorable to the spirit of secret devotion. Compare the notes at Daniel 6:10. The word here rendered prayer means properly speech, discourse; then, complaint; then, meditation. It is most commonly rendered complaint. See Job 7:13; Job 9:27; Job 10:1; Job 21:4; Psalm 55:2 (notes); Psalm 102 (Title); Psalm 142:2. It refers here to a state of mind caused by trouble and danger, when the deep meditation on his troubles and dangers found expression in audible words - whether those words were complaint or petition. As there are no indications in the psalm that David was disposed to complain in the sense of blaming God, the proper interpretation here is that his deep meditations took the form of prayer.

Preserve my life from fear of the enemy - Either Saul or Absalom. He prayed that his life might be made so secure that he would not have occasion to be afraid of his enemy.

Psalm 64:1 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Psalms
The piety of the Old Testament Church is reflected with more clearness and variety in the Psalter than in any other book of the Old Testament. It constitutes the response of the Church to the divine demands of prophecy, and, in a less degree, of law; or, rather, it expresses those emotions and aspirations of the universal heart which lie deeper than any formal demand. It is the speech of the soul face to face with God. Its words are as simple and unaffected as human words can be, for it is the genius
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
Psalm 55:2
Give heed to me and answer me; I am restless in my complaint and am surely distracted,

Psalm 61:1
For the choir director; on a stringed instrument. A Psalm of David. Hear my cry, O God; Give heed to my prayer.

Psalm 130:2
Lord, hear my voice! Let Your ears be attentive To the voice of my supplications.

Psalm 140:1
For the choir director. A Psalm of David. Rescue me, O LORD, from evil men; Preserve me from violent men

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