1 Timothy 3:4
Parallel Verses
New International Version
He must manage his own family well and see that his children obey him, and he must do so in a manner worthy of full respect.

King James Bible
One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity;

Darby Bible Translation
conducting his own house well, having [his] children in subjection with all gravity;

World English Bible
one who rules his own house well, having children in subjection with all reverence;

Young's Literal Translation
his own house leading well, having children in subjection with all gravity,

1 Timothy 3:4 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

The fourteenth qualification of a Christian bishop is, that he ruleth well his own house; του ιδιου οικου καλως προΐσταμενον, one who properly presides over and governs his own family. One who has the command, of his own house, not by sternness, severity, and tyranny, but with all gravity; governing his household by rule, every one knowing his own place, and each doing his own work, and each work having the proper time assigned for its beginning and end. This is a maxim of common sense; no family can be prosperous that is not under subjection, and no person can govern a family but the head of it, the husband, who is, both by nature and the appointment of God, the head or governor of his own house. See the note on Ephesians 5:22.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

ruleth.

1 Timothy 3:12 Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, ruling their children and their own houses well.

Genesis 18:19 For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the LORD...

Joshua 24:15 And if it seem evil to you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom you will serve...

Psalm 101:2-8 I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when will you come to me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart...

Acts 10:2 A devout man, and one that feared God with all his house, which gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always.

Titus 1:6 If any be blameless, the husband of one wife, having faithful children not accused of riot or unruly.

with.

Philippians 4:8 Finally, brothers, whatever things are true, whatever things are honest, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure...

*Gr:

Titus 2:2,7 That the aged men be sober, grave, temperate, sound in faith, in charity, in patience...

Library
Christ's Humiliation in his Incarnation
'Great is the mystery of godliness, God manifest in the flesh.' I Tim 3:16. Q-xxvii: WHEREIN DID CHRIST'S HUMILIATION CONSIST? A: In his being born, and that in a low condition, made under the law, undergoing the miseries of this life, the wrath of God, and the cursed death of the cross. Christ's humiliation consisted in his incarnation, his taking flesh, and being born. It was real flesh that Christ took; not the image of a body (as the Manichees erroneously held), but a true body; therefore he
Thomas Watson—A Body of Divinity

Since Our Pious and Christian Emperor Has Addressed this Holy and Ecumenical Council...
Since our pious and Christian Emperor has addressed this holy and ecumenical council, in order that it might provide for the purity of those who are in the list of the clergy, and who transmit divine things to others, and that they may be blameless ministrants, and worthy of the sacrifice of the great God, who is both Offering and High Priest, a sacrifice apprehended by the intelligence: and that it might cleanse away the pollutions wherewith these have been branded by unlawful marriages: now whereas
Philip Schaff—The Seven Ecumenical Councils

Of the Unity of the Godhead and the Trinity of Persons
Deut. vi. 4.--"Hear, O Israel The Lord our God is one Lord."--1 John v. 7 "There are three that bear record in heaven the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these three are one." "All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness," 2 Tim. iii. 16. There is no refuse in it, no simple and plain history, but it tends to some edification, no profound or deep mystery, but it is profitable for salvation. Whatsoever
Hugh Binning—The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning

Of the Practice of Piety in Fasting.
There are divers kinds of fasting--First, A constrained fast, as when men either have not food to eat, as in the famine of Samaria (2 Kings vi. 25;) or, having food, cannot eat it for heaviness or sickness, as it befel them who were in the ship with St. Paul (Acts xxvii. 33.) This is rather famine than fasting. Secondly, A natural fast, which we undertake physically, for the health of our body. Thirdly, A civil fast, which the magistrate enjoins for the better maintenance of the commonwealth. Fourthly,
Lewis Bayly—The Practice of Piety

1 Timothy 3:3
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