Proverbs 26:9
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Like a thornbush in a drunkard's hand is a proverb in the mouth of a fool.

King James Bible
As a thorn goeth up into the hand of a drunkard, so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Darby Bible Translation
[As] a thorn goeth up into the hand of a drunkard, so is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

World English Bible
Like a thornbush that goes into the hand of a drunkard, so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Young's Literal Translation
A thorn hath gone up into the hand of a drunkard, And a parable in the mouth of fools.

Proverbs 26:9 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

As he that bindeth a stone in a sling, so is he that giveth honor to a fool - It is entirely thrown away. This, however, is a difficult proverb; and the versions give but little light on the subject. The Hebrew may be translated, "As a piece of precious stone among a heap of stones, so is he that giveth honor to a fool." Or, As he that putteth a precious stone in a heap of stones. See Parkhurst: but on this interpretation the meaning would rather be, "It is as useless to throw a jewel among a heap of stones to increase its bulk, as to give honor to a fool."

As he that sendith a stoon into a hepe of monee; so he that geveth to an unwiisman wirschip - Old MS. Bible.

"He that setteth a foole in hye dignite, that is even as yf a man dyd caste a precious stone upon the galous." - Coverdale. This translator refers to the custom of throwing a stone to the heap under which a criminal lay buried. The Vulgate gives some countenance to this translation: "He who gives honor to a fool is like one who throws a stone to Mercury's heap." Mercury was considered the deity who presided over the highways; and stones were erected in different places to guide the traveler. Hence those lines of Dr. Young: -

"Death stands like Mercuries in every way;

And kindly points us to our journey's end."

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Proverbs 26:8 Like one who binds a stone in a sling, So is he who gives honor to a fool.

Proverbs 26:10 Like an archer who wounds everyone, So is he who hires a fool or who hires those who pass by.

Library
One Lion Two Lions no Lion at All
A sermon (No. 1670) delivered on Thursday Evening, June 8th, 1882, at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, Newington, by C. H. Spurgeon. "The slothful man saith, There is a lion without, I shall be slain in the streets."--Proverbs 22:13. "The slothful man saith, There is a lion in the way; a lion is in the streets."--Proverbs 26:13. This slothful man seems to cherish that one dread of his about the lions, as if it were his favorite aversion and he felt it to be too much trouble to invent another excuse.
C.H. Spurgeon—Sermons on Proverbs

Proverbs
Many specimens of the so-called Wisdom Literature are preserved for us in the book of Proverbs, for its contents are by no means confined to what we call proverbs. The first nine chapters constitute a continuous discourse, almost in the manner of a sermon; and of the last two chapters, ch. xxx. is largely made up of enigmas, and xxxi. is in part a description of the good housewife. All, however, are rightly subsumed under the idea of wisdom, which to the Hebrew had always moral relations. The Hebrew
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Proverbs 26:8
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