Psalm 122:6


Emphatically a pilgrim-song, and by a poet who usually lived in the country. Describes the pleasure felt at invitation to join a party who were going up to one of the feasts. We have the joy and music of the journey; then the impressions on arrival, the first passionate delight of being in the holy city - a city beautifully built, well compacted, adorned with palaces, and strongly fortified. Observe the intense feeling with which Jerusalem was regarded by Jews. Beautifully situated, it was the center of national and religious interest. Relics of the national feeling remain in the desire of modern Jews to die within its walls, and in the scenes at the "Place of Wailing." Many of us can understand this. We have a Jerusalem round which our thoughts entwine - the church of our fathers and of our childhood. What associations we have with it! Three words are here connected - Peace, prosperity, and prayer.

I. PEACE VERY LARGELY DEPENDS UPON PROSPERITY. "Peace" is a word with an extensive, beautiful, and suggestive connotation. We, perhaps, cannot fully realize it by any aid of memory; we can only enter into it with the help of the familiar engravings of 'War' and 'Peace.' It is not possible to overrate the value of peace for nations, or for Churches, or for families. But it largely depends on prosperity. This may be illustrated by the inward life of the religious man. Devotion and work are allowed to flag, soul-prosperity fails, and at once doubts and fears come to spoil the soul's peace. It may be illustrated in the life of the Church. When work and zeal and spiritual life - the signs of Church prosperity - fail, then differences are sure to come, roots of bitterness spring up.

II. PROSPERITY VERY LARGELY DEPENDS UPON PRAYER, Show the natural influence of prayer. It lifts into strength the better nature. Show the supernatural influence of prayer in bringing to us spiritual power. Plead for renewal of interest in private and individual prayer; and for more frequent and earnest united prayer. Secret forces are the mighty ones. Men take little count of the atmosphere, but it holds up the clouds. Who is it, then, upholds the prosperity of the Churches? Who are the peacemakers and the peace-keepers? Look below the surface, and you will be sure to see the men and women of faith and prayer. They gain for us prosperity, which leads in peace. - R.T.







Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.
I. WHEREIN THE GOOD OF THE CHURCH CONSISTS.

1. Peace. Not that which results from mere inertness or indifference, but that which co-exists with the highest degree of spiritual life and energy; a peace which springs from unanimity, all being of one mind and one judgment as to the great and paramount questions of Christian doctrine and duty, and displaying one toward another, with respect to minor points, the spirit of humility and kindly forbearance.

2. Prosperity. Not that which is implied in high worldly distinctions; but the gracious presence of Cod with His people, and the abundant continuous effusion of His Holy Spirit upon them.

II. THE MEANS BY WHICH THE GOOD OF THE CHURCH IS TO BE PROMOTED.

1. "Love" to the Church is indispensably requisite in order to fit us for rendering to her any effective and acceptable service. Under the influence of this principle, we shall be always ready to engage in any service which may promote the glory of God and the prosperity of His cause; we shall not be discouraged or driven aside by the difficulties that may obstruct our course; we shall patiently endure the infirmities and faults of other men; we shall, in one word, be "steadfast, unmovable," etc. (1 Corinthians 15:58).

2. Prayer is one direct means of securing the good of the Church (Isaiah 62:6, 7; 2 Thessalonians 3:1).

3. There must also be corresponding exertion (ver. 9). Every person, however humble his station, possesses some degree of ability to promote the good of the Church: let his gifts and influence, of whatever kind they are, be prayerfully and assiduously devoted to this object.

III. THE CONSIDERATIONS WHICH SHOULD URGE US ONWARD IN THIS COURSE OF DUTY TO THE CHURCH.

1. A regard for our own benefit. "They shall prosper that love thee." We may with absolute certainty take this promise in its spiritual import. The prosperity of the soul is, after all, our truest and highest prosperity.

2. Another incitement to seek the good of Jerusalem is supplied by philanthropy (ver. 8). Whatever concerns the welfare and salvation of our fellow-men concerns us. Our brethren and companions in the kingdom and patience of our Lord Jesus Christ, as members of His visible Church on earth, are obviously and directly interested in all that affects its peace and prosperity. By conserving the peace of the Church, and promoting its prosperity, we therefore contribute to the personal happiness and social elevation and improvement of mankind, in the most direct way, and upon the largest scale.

3. Above all, piety to God should stimulate us in this course (ver. 9). All we are and have, and all the good we still hope to realize throughout the vast future of our being, comes from God. Our obligations to serve and glorify Him are infinite, indissoluble, eternal. And is the Church His house, wherein He condescends to dwell? Then with what unremitting solicitude and assiduity should we seek its good!

(W. Herren.)

I. IN WHAT THE PROSPERITY OF THE TRUE CHURCH CONSISTS.

1. Doubtless, we must take, as a leading feature, though not to the disregard of others which are essential in themselves, that of a faithful and fully preached Gospel.

2. Purity of doctrines.

3. Strictness of discipline.

II. WHO ARE THE PERSONS WHO ARE COMMANDED TO PRAY FOR THE PEACE OF JERUSALEM, AND SEEK ITS PROSPERITY? They are Christians.

III. THE MEANS BY WHICH THIS END IS TO BE ACCOMPLISHED. Our first duty is that of earnest prayer for the prosperity of all people in the Church of Christ, and then sedulous and vigorous effort in order to promote it.

(J. S. Elliott.)

I. THE OBJECT FOR WHICH WE ARE TO PRAY.

1. That saving peace may be given to many persons.

2. For the peace of the congregation to which we belong.

3. For the peace of that branch of the Church with which we are connected.

4. For the peace of the whole Church of Christ.

II. THE COMMAND TO PRAY FOR THE PEACE OF THE CHURCH. "Pray for the peace of Jerusalem."

1. The persons to whom it is addressed. It is given to all the children of God.

2. Those persons who have broken the peace of the Church and who are to be overcome by prayer. Even good people, by an inadvertent word or deed, or by a mere blameworthy course of action, have done much to injure the cause of Him whom yet they love so much.

3. Him to whom prayer is to be offered. It is to be made to God. He is the hearer of prayer. He only can deliver the Church from the unhappy effects of the inadvertencies of friends, or from the malignity of enemies.

III. THE PROSPERITY PROMISED TO THOSE WHO PRAY FOR THE PEACE OF THE CHURCH. They will prosper —

1. By receiving an answer to their prayer.

2. In their souls.

3. According to the fulness of the meaning of the promise. It embraces our every interest, whether of body or of mind, or as connected with one's family, or with the congregation or Church to which we belong, or with the Church at large. It is a God-like promise.

(John McKay.)

I. THE PEACE OF JERUSALEM. This implies —

1. The piety of its members.

2. A spirit of inquiry, promoting conversion.

3. The prevalence of brotherly love; the spirit of union; the disposition to bear one another's burdens, relieve one another's wants.

4. Conscientious and diligent attendance on all the ordinances.

5. The due exercise of discipline.

II. THE EXHORTATION TO PRAY FOR THE PEACE OF JERUSALEM. There should be stated seasons of prayer for the Divine blessing on the Church: its prosperity will thus be secured, because it is His own concern; it is the sphere in which His glory is displayed; while it provides the only means of saving men. We should pray that He may set His hand a second time to His work, as it concerns the success of His Church.

III. THE PROMISE, connected with the exhortation in the text, ensures their own prosperity to these who seek that of the Church.

(R. Hall, M. A.)

1. God established it. The Temple of Solomon was builded by human hands and royal treasures. The king put his own money into it, but God was the real architect and builder. So the Church of Christ to-day is the purchase of the Redeemer's blood. It is God's instrumentality to bring the race back to God.

2. The history of what it has accomplished is another ground of loving, loyal attachment to the Church. It is more than an idea, it is an influence; more than a mere plan, even a power and blessing. It has brought light into human darkness, joy to human grief; it has brought help to the weary and fallen, inspiration H those who were disheartened.

3. It is the only regenerative power to which we may look for the future. Break down the Church of Christ, what else can bring salvation? Education, philosophy, science, and commerce, all the material wealth of the earth cannot take the place of the truth of God, of which His Church is a witness and herald. Take away the Church and you take sway the Gospel itself. In this materialistic age the Church exalts man's spiritual needs. Amid conflicting speculations, when men are saying, "Lo, here! lo, there," the Church of God points out the true way of life. The Church is the school of the soul. It defines real manhood. The Church aims at the "perfect man in Christ Jesus." In Him we are "complete," and by no other method of discipline and culture.

4. We should love the Church because it is our birthplace. When welcomed to heaven it will not be nationality or language that will characterize us. It is "in Zion" that this man and that man will say, "I was born."

5. The Church is our mother. She has fed us and nourished and taught us. We cannot but love her. She cared for us in weakness and spiritual infancy. Surely we should be base indeed to neglect her.

6. The Church is our home. This world is beautiful, but it is but the mere environment of our spiritual life, an incident in our absolute and eternal destiny. The soul can only find a home, restful and satisfying, in this fellowship with Him and His chosen ones we call the Church of Christ.

(C. M. Griffin, D. D.)

I. WHAT THIS PEACE IS.

1. The removal of evils.

2. The enjoyment of positive blessings. Jerusalem's prosperity is spiritual. It is produced by the light of God's countenance, and by the communications of His grace. When under these, the children of Zion grow in knowledge, holiness, and comfort, and enjoy all their privileges undisturbed; then Jerusalem hath peace.

II. REASONS WHY WE ARE TO PRAY FOR THE PEACE OF JERUSALEM.

1. Because God commands us not to hold our peace, till we see her peace.

2. Because of her relation to the God of peace. She is the house of God; the city of the great King; the object of His special providence.

3. Because of her relation to the Prince of Peace. She is His spouse, His body; she is built on Him.

4. Because her peace is purchased at a dear rate, even the blood of the Mediator of peace.

5. Because she has many enemies without, ready on all occasions to disturb her peace.

6. Because she has disturbers of her peace within.

(T. Boston, D. D.)

I. THE NATURE OF THE GOOD CONTEMPLATED. The prosperity of a Church is seen in its —

1. Spirituality.

(1)Of ministers.

(2)Of people.

2. Purity in discipline.

3. Unity and harmony.

4. Multiplication and extension.

II. THE MEANS OF ATTAINMENT PROPOSED.

1. Prayer.

2. Love of Zion.

3. Exertion.

III. THE MOTIVE. Many lose sight of their connection with Zion as a body; if so, you will never prosper in your own souls.

(J. Summerfield, M. A.)

The singer's emotion at sight of the city breaks into exhortation to his fellow-pilgrims to pray for its peace. Verse 6 contains a play on the meaning of the name of the city, which, as we now know from the Tel-el-Amarna tablets, was called "The city of peace" before the Israelitish conquest. The prayer is that the omen of the name may be fulfilled. The returning exiles were compassed about, by foes, and the name seemed rather irony than prophecy. The Church. too, has enemies to confront, and needs ever to offer this prayer. It is a true instinct which has led the Presbyterian Churches of Scotland to close the annual general assemblies with singing this part of our psalm, in the version which touches deep chords in many hearts: —

"Pray that Jerusalem may have

Peace and felicity."A similar play of words lies in the interchange of "peace" and "prosperity," which, in the Hebrew, are closely alike in sound.

(A. Maclaren, D. D.)

They shall prosper that love thee.
Sketches of Four Hundred Sermons.
I. THE SPECIFIED OBJECT OF PIOUS AFFECTION, ON — THE CHURCH OF GOD. Here we include the whole body of believers, united under Christ their common head, together with the ministers, officers, laws, regulations, immunities, and designs of the Messiah's kingdom (Ephesians 4:11-16). This holy attachment is founded on the most reasonable basis.

1. Uniformity of character. Dante has somewhere said, "Conformity of character is the bond of friendship." Whatever may he thought of this maxim in its general application to human nature, it certainly is strictly true when applied to the Christian, in reference to his affectionate attachment to the cause of truth.

2. The exhibition of the Divine perfections.

3. The invulnerable security of the Church.

4. Its increasing prosperity and final glory.

II. THE DISTINGUISHING EVIDENCES OF ITS EXISTENCE.

1. Sorrow in the time of calamity bears testimony to the sincere affection of the friends of Zion.

2. Pious exultation in the day of prosperity.

3. Zealous effort to promote the interests of the Church. Those who are sincerely attached to herd labour to extend her boundaries, in the earth, by the diffusion of Gospel light — the administration of affectionate reproof — the repetition of earnest entreaty — the breathing of fervent intercession — and the communication of pecuniary assistance, supported by a due consistency of character. These are so many additional proofs of pious affection (Jeremiah 26:12, 15; 1 Corinthians 9:19-23; Exodus 36:4-7; Nehemiah 4:15-23).

III. THE DECLARED ADVANTAGE RESULTING FROM IT: — "They shall prosper."(1) In their reputation. Their ardency of affection — their deep humility — their unwearied patience — their unbending integrity — and the general consistency of their character, procure for them the esteem of all who are like-minded, and very frequently even the approbation and confidence of unconverted men (Acts 26:28; Acts 27:43).(2) In their spiritual enjoyments: their capacities are enlarged — their faith increased — their union with Christ strengthened — and their anticipations of heavenly felicity multiplied (1 Timothy 6:6-8).(3) In their benevolent enterprises: their children and households instructed and regenerated — the harmony of the Church promoted — the progress of impiety and profaneness impeded — and their ungodly neighbours and friends converted from the error of their ways (Psalm 1:3).(4) In their temporal pursuits: although the religion of Jesus Christ does not warrant the expectation of opulence and grandeur, yet it secures to its adherents a regular supply of necessary things (Psalm 37:25; Luke 12:31).This subject teaches: —

1. That our professions of religion are of a very suspicious character, if unaccompanied with a corresponding zeal for the cause of God.

2. The folly of lukewarmness in matters of a religious nature (Revelation 3:16).

3. That genuine piety tends to promote the general welfare of its possessor (1 Timothy 4:8).

(Sketches of Four Hundred Sermons.)

I. THE GROUNDS ON WHICH LOVE FOR OUR COUNTRY RESTS.

1. As the seat of all our best enjoyments in private life.

2. As the seat of true religion.

3. As the seat of liberty and laws; a mild, wise and happy government.

II. THE DUTIES TO WHICH LOVE OF OUR COUNTRY GIVES RISE.

1. As private men and Christians, let us cultivate those virtues which are essential to the prosperity of our country. The foundation of all public happiness must be laid in the good conduct of individuals; in their industry, sobriety, justice, and regular attention to the duties of their several stations. Such virtues are the sinews and strength of the state; they are the supports of its prosperity at home, and of its reputation abroad.

2. Let us join to the virtues of private men those which belong to us in a political capacity as subjects and citizens. These must appear, in loyalty to our sovereign, in submission to the authority of rulers and magistrates, and in readiness to support the measures that are taken for public welfare and defence.

(H. Blair, D. D.)

I. THE GENIUS AND NATURE OF USEFUL TRUE, CONSISTENT PATRIOTISM.

1. It is a feeling natural to the human mind; the simple, the noble effect of qualities that are amiable and engaging.

2. It is also strongly approved of, beautifully enforced, and solemnly recommended by the language and example of unerring truth.

II. HOW THIS DISPOSITION OUGHT ALWAYS TO BE CHERISHED AND INVARIABLY EXPRESSED.

1. By yielding a due obedience to her existing varied laws.

2. By carefully suppressing, not abetting, or encouraging, in the smallest degree, anything that wears a hurtful, seditious, inflammatory aspect.

3. By uniformly performing such actions as may best advantage the state.

III. SOME OF THOSE OBLIGATIONS, UNDER WHICH WE ARE LAID THUS TO THINK, AND THUS TO ACT.

1. We are inhabitants of Britain, subjects of a free constitution, of wise and happy laws. Encircle the constitution with your love and obedience. Crown it with your prayers, and be glad that you are Britons.

2. Another obligation under which we are laid thus to think and thus to act, naturally springs from that countenance and protection which our present Church arrangement has new for so long so happily enjoyed.

(A. Stirling, LL. D.)

It is incumbent on us to love our country, and to pray for the peace thereof, on account of —

I. OUR INTIMATE CONNECTION WITH ITS INHABITANTS. If it be natural to the human mind to contract an attachment to those with whom we are united by the ties of affinity and the intercourse of society, then the love of our country is a natural and well-founded affection. It seems to be as natural as the affection of mothers and children, or that between brothers and sisters. It arises out of the very constitution of man, as formed by the hand of God, and is one of the first principles of human nature.

II. OUR FRIENDS AND RELATIVES WHO BELONG TO IT. For many generations past, this has been the land of our ancestors from whom we are descended, and whom we naturally venerate. Here are the sepulchres of our fathers and mothers, the objects of our first and purest affection, whose memories are still dear to us. This is the residence of our friends and neighbours, of our connections and relatives, of all those with whom we are most closely united, and in whose welfare we are most deeply interested. Their happiness, as well as our own, is connected with the public welfare.

III. THE CIVIL FREEDOM WE ENJOY. It is true there may be some defects in the constitution, which experience has discovered, and which time may remedy. And there may be some shameful abuses in the administration which provoke the indignation of the public, and call loudly for redress. Yet, in the midst of these grievances, our situation is preferable to that of almost all nations upon earth.

IV. OUR RELIGIOUS LIBERTY. The rights of conscience are respected, and every man is at liberty to draw his own faith from the Word of God, and to worship the Supreme Being in his own way.

(A. Donnan.)

Links
Psalm 122:6 NIV
Psalm 122:6 NLT
Psalm 122:6 ESV
Psalm 122:6 NASB
Psalm 122:6 KJV

Psalm 122:6 Bible Apps
Psalm 122:6 Parallel
Psalm 122:6 Biblia Paralela
Psalm 122:6 Chinese Bible
Psalm 122:6 French Bible
Psalm 122:6 German Bible

Psalm 122:6 Commentaries

Bible Hub
Psalm 122:5
Top of Page
Top of Page