John 13:14
New International Version
Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet.

New Living Translation
And since I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash each other’s feet.

English Standard Version
If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

Berean Study Bible
So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet.

Berean Literal Bible
Therefore if I, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash the feet of one another.

King James Bible
If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

New King James Version
If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

New American Standard Bible
So if I, the Lord and the Teacher, washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

NASB 1995
“If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

NASB 1977
“If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

Amplified Bible
So if I, the Lord and the Teacher, washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet as well.

Christian Standard Bible
So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

American Standard Version
If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
If I therefore, your Lord and your Rabbi, have washed your feet for you, how much more ought you to wash one another's feet?”

Contemporary English Version
And if your Lord and teacher has washed your feet, you should do the same for each other.

Douay-Rheims Bible
If then I being your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; you also ought to wash one another's feet.

English Revised Version
If I then, the Lord and the Master, have washed your feet, ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

Good News Translation
I, your Lord and Teacher, have just washed your feet. You, then, should wash one another's feet.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
So if I, your Lord and teacher, have washed your feet, you must wash each other's feet.

International Standard Version
So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you must also wash one another's feet.

Literal Standard Version
if then I washed your feet—the LORD and the Teacher—you also ought to wash one another’s feet.

NET Bible
If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you too ought to wash one another's feet.

New Heart English Bible
If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another's feet.

Weymouth New Testament
If I then, your Master and Rabbi, have washed your feet, it is also your duty to wash one another's feet.

World English Bible
If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another's feet.

Young's Literal Translation
if then I did wash your feet -- the Lord and the Teacher -- ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

Additional Translations ...
Context
Jesus Washes His Disciples' Feet
13You call Me Teacher and Lord, and rightly so, because I am. 14So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet. 15I have set you an example so that you should do as I have done for you.…

Cross References
John 11:2
(Mary, whose brother Lazarus was sick, was to anoint the Lord with perfume and wipe His feet with her hair.)

1 Corinthians 12:3
Therefore I inform you that no one who is speaking by the Spirit of God says, "Jesus be cursed," and no one can say, "Jesus is Lord," except by the Holy Spirit.

Philippians 2:11
and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

1 Timothy 5:10
and well known for good deeds such as bringing up children, entertaining strangers, washing the feet of the saints, imparting relief to the afflicted, and devoting herself to every good work.


Treasury of Scripture

If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; you also ought to wash one another's feet.

I then.

Matthew 20:26-28
But it shall not be so among you: but whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister; …

Mark 10:43-45
But so shall it not be among you: but whosoever will be great among you, shall be your minister: …

Luke 22:26,27
But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve…

ye also.

Acts 20:35
I have shewed you all things, how that so labouring ye ought to support the weak, and to remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he said, It is more blessed to give than to receive.

Romans 12:10,16
Be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love; in honour preferring one another; …

Romans 15:1-3
We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves…









(14) Ye ought also to wash one another's feet.--The argument is a fortiori. If He had so humbled Himself as to do the work of a servant for them, much more ought they to humble themselves for each other. To make his words as striking as possible, they are prefaced by the emphatic I, and "Master and Lord" is repeated from the previous verse, but in the inverse order, to give special prominence to the word of greater dignity.

Verses 14, 15. - If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet; ye ought also to wash one another's feet: for I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. Καθώς, "as," "like as," was used by our Lord rather than , "that which." The ὑπόδειγμα shows that he had set before his disciples a parallel, an example, a symbolic type of the service they were to render to one another, and was not establishing a custom or exact ordinance. The washing of the feet was an Oriental custom of great antiquity as a mark of hospitality (Genesis 18:4; Genesis 19:2; Abigail, 1 Samuel 25:41; see also Luke 7:38, 44). In 1 Timothy 5:10 there is trace of such a custom of Christian hospitality. Considering the ease with which the Church has established a ceremonial from an isolated text, it is remarkable that no more literal use has been made of this injunction. However, Maundy Thursday, a name derived from Dies mandati, was celebrated as the day on which this great command, or that contained in ver. 34, was given - Mandatum novum do vobis - and the feet of the newly baptized were washed. The endeavor to make Augustine the authority for this religious practice is doubtful; but the Council of Toledo (A.D. 694) mentions this particular day as that on which it was appropriate. In the early Gallican Church there was such a ritual, and the forms of pedilavium observed are to be read in early Gothic and Galliean missals. Bernard of Clairvaux tried to convert the ceremony into a sacrament, but without success. And it would seem that some effort was made to introduce it into Spain. "In 1530, Wolsey washed, wiped, and kissed the feet of fifty-nine poor men at Peterborough. The practice was continued by English sovereigns till the reign of James II." (Westcott). No traces of it are to be found in the Ambrosian ritual, but the preservation of the custom is found now in the Russian imperial palace, in the ceremonies of the holy week at Rome, and in the palaces of Vienna, Madrid,Munich. The practice was for a time retained by the United Brethren and Mennonites, and the Tunkers of Philadelphia (see 'Dictionary of Christian Antiquities,' vol. 1. arts. "Baptism," §§ 34, 67, and "Maundy Thursday;" Herzog., 'Encyc.,' art. "Fusswaschung," by H. Merz; and Schaff's 'Herzog.,' art. "Tunkers"). The Church has for the most part looked below the mere form to the real substance of the Lord's teaching, and only thus can we appreciate it adequately. The very injunction would be an inadequate, burdensome one where the feet are covered, and would become impossible and valueless in the Northern and Western world. The service demanded is the self-forgetting ministry of love, which places the interests of self behind and below those of others. Nothing is more theoretically easy and acceptable than this principle, but nothing more difficult of accomplishment. This sentence of our Lord is a noble illustration of the method in which a great principle is made by him the basis of a small duly (cf. Paul's vindication of his own truthfulness and freedom from ἐλάφρια, 2 Corinthians 1:17-20; he based it on God's own faithfulness to promise).

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek
So
οὖν (oun)
Conjunction
Strong's 3767: Therefore, then. Apparently a primary word; certainly, or accordingly.

if
εἰ (ei)
Conjunction
Strong's 1487: If. A primary particle of conditionality; if, whether, that, etc.

I,
ἐγὼ (egō)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Nominative 1st Person Singular
Strong's 1473: I, the first-person pronoun. A primary pronoun of the first person I.

[your]
(ho)
Article - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Lord
Κύριος (Kyrios)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 2962: Lord, master, sir; the Lord. From kuros; supreme in authority, i.e. controller; by implication, Master.

and
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

Teacher,
Διδάσκαλος (Didaskalos)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's 1320: A teacher, master. From didasko; an instructor.

have washed
ἔνιψα (enipsa)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 1st Person Singular
Strong's 3538: To wash; mid. I wash my own (hands, etc.). To cleanse; ceremonially, to perform ablution.

your
ὑμῶν (hymōn)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 2nd Person Plural
Strong's 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

feet,
πόδας (podas)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's 4228: The foot. A primary word; a 'foot'.

you
ὑμεῖς (hymeis)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Nominative 2nd Person Plural
Strong's 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

also
καὶ (kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

should
ὀφείλετε (opheilete)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's 3784: Or, its prolonged form opheileo probably from the base of ophelos; to owe; figuratively, to be under obligation; morally, to fail in duty.

wash
νίπτειν (niptein)
Verb - Present Infinitive Active
Strong's 3538: To wash; mid. I wash my own (hands, etc.). To cleanse; ceremonially, to perform ablution.

one another’s
ἀλλήλων (allēlōn)
Personal / Reciprocal Pronoun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's 240: One another, each other. Genitive plural from allos reduplicated; one another.

feet.
πόδας (podas)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's 4228: The foot. A primary word; a 'foot'.


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