Matthew 6:28
New International Version
"And why do you worry about clothes? See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin.

New Living Translation
“And why worry about your clothing? Look at the lilies of the field and how they grow. They don’t work or make their clothing,

English Standard Version
And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin,

Berean Study Bible
And why do you worry about clothes? Consider how the lilies of the field grow: They do not labor or spin.

Berean Literal Bible
And why do you worry about clothing? Consider carefully how the lilies of the field grow: They do not labor nor do they spin.

New American Standard Bible
"And why are you worried about clothing? Observe how the lilies of the field grow; they do not toil nor do they spin,

King James Bible
And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

Christian Standard Bible
And why do you worry about clothes? Observe how the wildflowers of the field grow: They don't labor or spin thread.

Contemporary English Version
Why worry about clothes? Look how the wild flowers grow. They don't work hard to make their clothes.

Good News Translation
"And why worry about clothes? Look how the wild flowers grow: they do not work or make clothes for themselves.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
And why do you worry about clothes? Learn how the wildflowers of the field grow: they don't labor or spin thread.

International Standard Version
And why do you worry about clothes? Consider the lilies in the field and how they grow. They don't work or spin yarn,

NET Bible
Why do you worry about clothing? Think about how the flowers of the field grow; they do not work or spin.

New Heart English Bible
And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They do not toil, neither do they spin,

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And why are you taking pains about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow without laboring or weaving.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"And why worry about clothes? Notice how the flowers grow in the field. They never work or spin yarn for clothes.

New American Standard 1977
“And why are you anxious about clothing? Observe how the lilies of the field grow; they do not toil nor do they spin,

Jubilee Bible 2000
And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they toil not, neither do they spin;

King James 2000 Bible
And why take you thought for clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

American King James Version
And why take you thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

American Standard Version
And why are ye anxious concerning raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

Douay-Rheims Bible
And for raiment why are you solicitous? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they labour not, neither do they spin.

Darby Bible Translation
And why are ye careful about clothing? Observe with attention the lilies of the field, how they grow: they toil not, neither do they spin;

English Revised Version
And why are ye anxious concerning raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

Webster's Bible Translation
And why are ye anxious for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field how they grow? they toil not, neither do they spin?

Weymouth New Testament
And why be anxious about clothing? Learn a lesson from the wild lilies. Watch their growth. They neither toil nor spin,

World English Bible
Why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow. They don't toil, neither do they spin,

Young's Literal Translation
and about clothing why are ye anxious? consider well the lilies of the field; how do they grow? they do not labour, nor do they spin;
Study Bible
Do Not Worry
27Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life? 28And why do you worry about clothes? Consider how the lilies of the field grow: They do not labor or spin. 29Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his glory was adorned like one of these.…
Cross References
Hosea 14:5
I will be like the dew to Israel; he will blossom like the lily and take root like the cedars of Lebanon.

Matthew 6:25
Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes?

Matthew 6:27
Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life?

Luke 10:41
"Martha, Martha," the Lord replied, "you are worried and upset about many things.

Luke 12:11
When you are brought before the synagogues, rulers, and authorities, do not worry about how to defend yourselves or what to say.

Luke 12:22
Then Jesus said to His disciples, "Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat, or about your body, what you will wear.

Luke 12:27
Consider how the lilies grow: They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you, not even Solomon in all his glory was adorned like one of these.

Philippians 4:6
Be anxious for nothing, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

1 Peter 5:7
Cast all your anxiety on Him, because He cares for you.

Treasury of Scripture

And why take you thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

why.

Matthew 6:25,31
Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than raiment? …

Matthew 10:10
Nor scrip for your journey, neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yet staves: for the workman is worthy of his meat.

Luke 3:11
He answereth and saith unto them, He that hath two coats, let him impart to him that hath none; and he that hath meat, let him do likewise.

the lilies.

Luke 12:27
Consider the lilies how they grow: they toil not, they spin not; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.







Lexicon
And
Καὶ (Kai)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 2532: And, even, also, namely.

why
τί (ti)
Interrogative / Indefinite Pronoun - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 5101: Who, which, what, why. Probably emphatic of tis; an interrogative pronoun, who, which or what.

do you worry
μεριμνᾶτε (merimnate)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 3309: To be over-anxious; with acc: To be anxious about, distracted; I care for. From merimna; to be anxious about.

about
περὶ (peri)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 4012: From the base of peran; properly, through, i.e. Around; figuratively with respect to; used in various applications, of place, cause or time.

clothes?
ἐνδύματος (endymatos)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 1742: A garment, raiment, clothing. From enduo; apparel.

Consider
καταμάθετε (katamathete)
Verb - Aorist Imperative Active - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 2648: To understand, take in a fact about, consider carefully. From kata and manthano; to learn thoroughly, i.e. to note carefully.

how
πῶς (pōs)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 4459: Adverb from the base of pou; an interrogative particle of manner; in what way?; also as exclamation, how much!

the
τὰ (ta)
Article - Accusative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

lilies
κρίνα (krina)
Noun - Accusative Neuter Plural
Strong's Greek 2918: A lily growing wild, variously identified with the red anemone, the whole lily, the sword lily. Perhaps a prim word; a lily.

of the
τοῦ (tou)
Article - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

field
ἀγροῦ (agrou)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 68: From ago; a field; genitive case, the country; specially, a farm, i.e. Hamlet.

grow:
αὐξάνουσιν (auxanousin)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 837: (a) I cause to increase, become greater (b) I increase, grow. A prolonged form of a primary verb; to grow, i.e. Enlarge.

[They do] not
οὐ (ou)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3756: No, not. Also ouk, and ouch a primary word; the absolute negative adverb; no or not.

labor
κοπιῶσιν (kopiōsin)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 2872: From a derivative of kopos; to feel fatigue; by implication, to work hard.

[or]
οὐδὲ (oude)
Conjunction
Strong's Greek 3761: Neither, nor, not even, and not. From ou and de; not however, i.e. Neither, nor, not even.

spin.
νήθουσιν (nēthousin)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's Greek 3514: To spin. From neo; to spin.
(28) Why take ye thought for raiment?--The question might well be asked of every race of the whole family of man. Yet we ought not to forget its special pointedness as addressed to a people who reckoned their garments, not less than their money, as part of their capital, and often expended on them the labour of many weeks or months. (Comp. Matthew 6:20; James 5:2.)

Consider the lilies of the field.--Here again we may think of the lesson as drawn immediately from the surrounding objects. The hill-sides of Galilee are clothed in spring with the crown imperial, and the golden amaryllis, and crimson tulips, and anemones of all shades from scarlet to white, to say nothing of the commoner buttercups and dandelions and daisies; and all these are probably classed roughly together under the generic name of "lilies." And these, with what we may reverently speak of as a love of Nature, the Lord tells His disciples to "consider," i.e., not merely to look at with a passing glance, but to study--to learn, as it were, by heart--till they have realised every beauty of structure and form and hue.

Verse 28. - Parallel passage: Luke 12:26, 27. Luke's is longer and seemingly more original. But in the absence of external evidence, it must always be a matter of opinion whether Matthew has compressed the longer form of the words, or vice versa. And why take ye thought for raiment? In vers. 25-27 our Lord had spoken of food; in vers. 28-30 he speaks of dress. He insists on the needlessness (ver. 28) and on the comparative uselessness (ver. 29) of anxiety about it, since even the king who had the greatest opportunities could not vie in clothing with a single lily. Flowers have this glorious clothing (ver. 30), though they are so perishable: much more shall you be clothed. Consider (ver. 26, note). The lilies (τὰ κρίνα). Though there are many kinds of lilies in Palestine, and some of brilliant colouring (particularly the purple and white Huleh lily found round Nazareth), yet none of them grows in such abundance as to give the tone to the colouring of the flowers generally. It seems, therefore, probable that the word is employed loosely. So, perhaps, in the LXX. of Exodus 25:31, 33, 34, and other passages, where it represents the "flowers" (פֶּרַח) on the candlestick. It appears, too, that שׁושֶׁן ("lily," Authorized Version in Canticles) is also used by the Arabs of any bright flower. If a single species is to be thought of, Canon Tristram would prefer the Anemone coronaria of our gardens, which is "the most gorgeously painted, the most conspicuous in spring, and the most universally spread of all the floral treasures of the Holy Land" ('Natural History of the Bible,' p. 464, edit. 1877). Of the field. Matthew only in this phrase (but cf. ver. 30, note). Its insertion emphasizes the spontaneity of origin, the absence of cultivation, the "waste" as not grown for the comfort or pleasure of man. How they grow. Professor Drummond's beautiful remarks upon this verse ('Natural Law,' etc.) do not belong to exegesis, but to homily, for the stress of our Lord's words lies on "grow," not on "how;" he is thinking of the fact, net the manner of their growth. They toil not; to produce the raw material. Neither do they spin; to manufacture it when produced. "Illud virorum est, qui agrum colunt; hoc mulie-rum domisedarum" (Wetstein). 6:25-34 There is scarcely any sin against which our Lord Jesus more warns his disciples, than disquieting, distracting, distrustful cares about the things of this life. This often insnares the poor as much as the love of wealth does the rich. But there is a carefulness about temporal things which is a duty, though we must not carry these lawful cares too far. Take no thought for your life. Not about the length of it; but refer it to God to lengthen or shorten it as he pleases; our times are in his hand, and they are in a good hand. Not about the comforts of this life; but leave it to God to make it bitter or sweet as he pleases. Food and raiment God has promised, therefore we may expect them. Take no thought for the morrow, for the time to come. Be not anxious for the future, how you shall live next year, or when you are old, or what you shall leave behind you. As we must not boast of tomorrow, so we must not care for to-morrow, or the events of it. God has given us life, and has given us the body. And what can he not do for us, who did that? If we take care about our souls and for eternity, which are more than the body and its life, we may leave it to God to provide for us food and raiment, which are less. Improve this as an encouragement to trust in God. We must reconcile ourselves to our worldly estate, as we do to our stature. We cannot alter the disposals of Providence, therefore we must submit and resign ourselves to them. Thoughtfulness for our souls is the best cure of thoughtfulness for the world. Seek first the kingdom of God, and make religion your business: say not that this is the way to starve; no, it is the way to be well provided for, even in this world. The conclusion of the whole matter is, that it is the will and command of the Lord Jesus, that by daily prayers we may get strength to bear us up under our daily troubles, and to arm us against the temptations that attend them, and then let none of these things move us. Happy are those who take the Lord for their God, and make full proof of it by trusting themselves wholly to his wise disposal. Let thy Spirit convince us of sin in the want of this disposition, and take away the worldliness of our hearts.
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