Proverbs 26:7
New International Version
Like the useless legs of one who is lame is a proverb in the mouth of a fool.

New Living Translation
A proverb in the mouth of a fool is as useless as a paralyzed leg.

English Standard Version
Like a lame man’s legs, which hang useless, is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

Berean Study Bible
Like lame legs hanging limp is a proverb in the mouth of a fool.

King James Bible
The legs of the lame are not equal: so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

New King James Version
Like the legs of the lame that hang limp Is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

New American Standard Bible
Like useless legs to one who cannot walk, So is a proverb in the mouths of fools.

NASB 1995
Like the legs which are useless to the lame, So is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

NASB 1977
Like the legs which hang down from the lame, So is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

Amplified Bible
Like the legs which are useless to the lame, So is a proverb in the mouth of a fool [who cannot learn from its wisdom].

Christian Standard Bible
A proverb in the mouth of a fool is like lame legs that hang limp.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
A proverb in the mouth of a fool is like lame legs that hang limp.

American Standard Version
The legs of the lame hang loose: So is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
If you make a cripple walk, you may take the word of a fool.

Brenton Septuagint Translation
As well take away the motion of the legs, as transgression from the mouth of fools.

Contemporary English Version
A fool with words of wisdom is like an athlete with legs that can't move.

Douay-Rheims Bible
As a lame man hath fair legs in vain: so a parable is unseemly in the mouth of fools.

English Revised Version
The legs of the lame hang loose: so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Good News Translation
A fool can use a proverb about as well as crippled people can use their legs.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
[Like] a lame person's limp legs, so is a proverb in the mouths of fools.

International Standard Version
Useless legs to the lame— that's what a proverb quoted by a fool is.

JPS Tanakh 1917
The legs hang limp from the lame; So is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Literal Standard Version
The two legs of the lame have been weak, And an allegory in the mouth of fools.

NET Bible
Like legs that hang limp from the lame, so is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

New Heart English Bible
Like the legs of the lame that hang loose: so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

World English Bible
Like the legs of the lame that hang loose: so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Young's Literal Translation
Weak have been the two legs of the lame, And a parable in the mouth of fools.

Additional Translations ...
Context
Similitudes and Instructions
6Like cutting off one’s own feet or drinking violence is the sending of a message by the hand of a fool. 7Like lame legs hanging limp is a proverb in the mouth of a fool. 8Like binding a stone into a sling is the giving of honor to a fool.…

Cross References
Proverbs 26:6
Like cutting off one's own feet or drinking violence is the sending of a message by the hand of a fool.

Proverbs 26:8
Like binding a stone into a sling is the giving of honor to a fool.


Treasury of Scripture

The legs of the lame are not equal: so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

not equal

Proverbs 26:9
As a thorn goeth up into the hand of a drunkard, so is a parable in the mouth of fools.

Proverbs 17:7
Excellent speech becometh not a fool: much less do lying lips a prince.

Psalm 50:16-21
But unto the wicked God saith, What hast thou to do to declare my statutes, or that thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth? …









(7) The legs of the lame are not equal.--Better, perhaps. The legs hang down from a lame man, and so is a parable (useless) in the mouth of fools; they can make no more use of it for the guidance of themselves or others, than can a lame man use his legs. (Comp. Luke 8:10.)

Verse 7. - The legs of a lame man are not equal. The first word of this verse, דַּלְיוּ, has occasioned some difficulty. It is considered as an imperative from דלה, "draw off," "take away." Thus the Septuagint, ἀφελοῦ; Venetian, ἐπάρατε. But the verb seems never to have this meaning; nor, if it had, would the sense be very satisfactory, for. as Delitzsch points out, lame legs are better than none, and there is a great difference between the perfectly crippled or paralytic who has to be carried, and the lame man (פִסֵּחַ) who can limp or get along on crutches., And when we explain the proverb in this sense (as Plumptre), "Take away the legs of the lame man and the parable from the mouth of fools," for both alike ere useless to their possessors, and their loss would not be felt - we must recognize that the conclusion is not true. No one would think of amputating s man's legs simply because he was lame, and such a one's legs cannot be considered absolutely useless. Others regard the word as third plural kal, "the legs hang loose;" though the form is not sufficiently accounted for. All explanations of the word as a verbal form have such difficulties, that some take it as a noun, meaning "dancing," which is Luther's interpretation, "as dancing to a cripple, so it becometh a fool to talk of wisdom." But the word could never sightly anything but "limping," and could not express the elegant motion of dancing. The Authorized Version considers the Hebrew to mean, "are lifted up," i.e. are unequal, one being longer or stronger than the other; but this loses the force of the comparison. There seems to be no better interpretation than that mentioned above," The legs of the lame hang loose," i.e. are unserviceable, however sound in appearance. St. Jerome has expressed this, though in a strange fashion, "As it is vain for a lame man to have seemly legs." So is a parable in the mouth of a fool. "Parable" (mashal), sententious saying, the enunciation of which, as well as the recital of stories, was always a great feature in Eastern companies, and afforded a test of a man's ability. A fool fails in the exhibition; he misses the point of the wise saying which he produces; it falls lame from his mouth, affords no instruction to others, and makes no way with its hearers. Siracides gives another reason for the incongruity, "A parable shall be rejected when it cometh out of a fool's mouth; for he will not speak it in its season" (Ecclus. 20:20). Septuagint, "Take away the motion of legs, and transgression (παρανομίαν,? παροιμίαν, Lag.) from the mouth of fools."

Parallel Commentaries ...


Hebrew
Like lame
מִפִּסֵּ֑חַ (mip·pis·sê·aḥ)
Preposition-m | Adjective - masculine singular
Strong's 6455: Lame

legs
שֹׁ֭קַיִם (qa·yim)
Noun - fd
Strong's 7785: The, leg

hanging limp
דַּלְי֣וּ (dal·yū)
Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person common plural
Strong's 1809: To slacken, be feeble, to be oppressed

is a proverb
וּ֝מָשָׁ֗ל (ū·mā·šāl)
Conjunctive waw | Noun - masculine singular
Strong's 4912: A pithy maxim, a simile

in the mouth
בְּפִ֣י (bə·p̄î)
Preposition-b | Noun - masculine singular construct
Strong's 6310: The mouth, edge, portion, side, according to

of a fool.
כְסִילִֽים׃ (ḵə·sî·lîm)
Noun - masculine plural
Strong's 3684: Stupid fellow, dullard, fool


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OT Poetry: Proverbs 26:7 Like the legs of the lame that (Prov. Pro Pr)
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