John 12:1
New International Version
Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus lived, whom Jesus had raised from the dead.

New Living Translation
Six days before the Passover celebration began, Jesus arrived in Bethany, the home of Lazarus—the man he had raised from the dead.

English Standard Version
Six days before the Passover, Jesus therefore came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead.

Berean Study Bible
Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, the hometown of Lazarus, whom He had raised from the dead.

Berean Literal Bible
Therefore six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised out from the dead.

New American Standard Bible
Jesus, therefore, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead.

King James Bible
Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

Christian Standard Bible
Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany where Lazarus was, the one Jesus had raised from the dead.

Contemporary English Version
Six days before Passover Jesus went back to Bethany, where he had raised Lazarus from death.

Good News Translation
Six days before the Passover, Jesus went to Bethany, the home of Lazarus, the man he had raised from death.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany where Lazarus was, the one Jesus had raised from the dead.

International Standard Version
Six days before the Passover, Jesus arrived in Bethany, where Lazarus lived, the man whom Jesus had raised from the dead.

NET Bible
Then, six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus lived, whom he had raised from the dead.

New Heart English Bible
Then six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, whom Jesus raised from the dead.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
But Yeshua came to Bethany before the six days of the Passover, where Lazar was, whom Yeshua had raised from the grave.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Six days before Passover, Jesus arrived in Bethany. Lazarus, whom Jesus had brought back to life, lived there.

New American Standard 1977
Jesus, therefore, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany where Lazarus was, whom Jesus had raised from the dead.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Jesus, therefore, six days before the passover, came to Bethany, where Lazarus was who had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

King James 2000 Bible
Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was who had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

American King James Version
Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

American Standard Version
Jesus therefore six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, whom Jesus raised from the dead.

Douay-Rheims Bible
JESUS therefore, six days before the pasch, came to Bethania, where Lazarus had been dead, whom Jesus raised to life.

Darby Bible Translation
Jesus therefore, six days before the passover, came to Bethany, where was the dead [man] Lazarus, whom Jesus raised from among [the] dead.

English Revised Version
Jesus therefore six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, whom Jesus raised from the dead.

Webster's Bible Translation
Then Jesus, six days before the passover, came to Bethany, where Lazarus was who had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

Weymouth New Testament
Jesus, however, six days before the Passover, came to Bethany, where Lazarus was whom He had raised from the dead.

World English Bible
Then six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, who had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

Young's Literal Translation
Jesus, therefore, six days before the passover, came to Bethany, where was Lazarus, who had died, whom he raised out of the dead;
Study Bible
Mary Anoints Jesus
1Six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, the hometown of Lazarus, whom He had raised from the dead. 2So they hosted a dinner for Jesus there. Martha served, and Lazarus was among those reclining at the table with Him.…
Cross References
Matthew 21:17
Then He left them and went out of the city to Bethany, where He spent the night.

Matthew 26:6
While Jesus was in Bethany in the home of Simon the leper,

Mark 14:3
While Jesus was in Bethany reclining at the table in the home of Simon the leper, a woman came with an alabaster jar of expensive perfume, made of pure nard. She broke open the jar and poured it on Jesus' head.

Luke 7:37
When a sinful woman from that town learned that Jesus was dining there, she brought an alabaster jar of perfume.

John 11:43
After Jesus had said this, He called out in a loud voice, "Lazarus, come out!"

John 11:55
Now the Jewish Passover was near, and many people went up from the country to Jerusalem to purify themselves before the Passover.

John 12:9
Meanwhile a large crowd of Jews learned that Jesus was there. And they came not only because of Him, but also to see Lazarus, whom He had raised from the dead.

John 12:12
The next day the great crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem.

John 12:20
Now there were some Greeks among those who went up to worship at the feast.

Treasury of Scripture

Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

six.

John 11:55
And the Jews' passover was nigh at hand: and many went out of the country up to Jerusalem before the passover, to purify themselves.

Bethany.

John 11:1,44
Now a certain man was sick, named Lazarus, of Bethany, the town of Mary and her sister Martha…

Matthew 21:17
And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there.

Mark 11:11
And Jesus entered into Jerusalem, and into the temple: and when he had looked round about upon all things, and now the eventide was come, he went out unto Bethany with the twelve.







Lexicon
Six
ἓξ (hex)
Adjective - Genitive Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 1803: Six. A primary numeral; six.

days
ἡμερῶν (hēmerōn)
Noun - Genitive Feminine Plural
Strong's Greek 2250: A day, the period from sunrise to sunset.

before
πρὸ (pro)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 4253: A primary preposition; 'fore', i.e. In front of, prior to.

the
τοῦ (tou)
Article - Genitive Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

Passover,
πάσχα (pascha)
Noun - Genitive Neuter Singular
Strong's Greek 3957: The feast of Passover, the Passover lamb. Of Chaldee origin; the Passover.

Jesus
Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2424: Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites.

came
ἦλθεν (ēlthen)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2064: To come, go.

to
εἰς (eis)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1519: A primary preposition; to or into, of place, time, or purpose; also in adverbial phrases.

Bethany,
Βηθανίαν (Bēthanian)
Noun - Accusative Feminine Singular
Strong's Greek 963: Of Chaldee origin; date-house; Beth-any, a place in Palestine.

[the hometown of]
ὅπου (hopou)
Adverb
Strong's Greek 3699: Where, whither, in what place. From hos and pou; what(-ever) where, i.e. At whichever spot.

Lazarus,
Λάζαρος (Lazaros)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2976: Probably of Hebrew origin; Lazarus, the name of two Israelites.

whom
ὃν (hon)
Personal / Relative Pronoun - Accusative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 3739: Who, which, what, that.

[He]
Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous)
Noun - Nominative Masculine Singular
Strong's Greek 2424: Of Hebrew origin; Jesus, the name of our Lord and two other Israelites.

had raised
ἤγειρεν (ēgeiren)
Verb - Aorist Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 1453: (a) I wake, arouse, (b) I raise up. Probably akin to the base of agora; to waken, i.e. Rouse.

from
ἐκ (ek)
Preposition
Strong's Greek 1537: From out, out from among, from, suggesting from the interior outwards. A primary preposition denoting origin, from, out.

[the] dead.
νεκρῶν (nekrōn)
Adjective - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's Greek 3498: (a) adj: dead, lifeless, subject to death, mortal, (b) noun: a dead body, a corpse. From an apparently primary nekus; dead.
XII.

(1) Then Jesus six days before the Passover came to Bethany.--The whole question of the arrangement of days during this last great week depends upon the conclusion which we adopt with regard to the day on which our Lord was crucified. The discussion of this is reserved for a separate Note, where it may be fully dealt with. (Comp. Excursus F: The Day of the Crucifixion of our Lord.)

Verses 1-8. -

1. The feast of love and gratitude. Verse 1. - Jesus therefore, six days before the Passover. Every preliminary of that solemn feast is memorable to our evangelist. The coincidence of the Passover feast and the killing of the Paschal lamb, with the sacrifice of "Christ our Passover," cannot be concealed. [For the grammatical construction with πρὸ, cf. note, John 11:18, where a similar use of ἀπό occurs; not, however, a Latinism, as some have supposed, as similar phrases are found in good Greek (see Winer, ' Greek Gram.,' p. 69).] The date from which the calculation is made is complicated with the intricate controversy upon the day of our Lord's death, i.e. whether he suffered on the 14th or 15th of Nisan, and whether a "harmony" is possible or not with the statements of the synoptists, who all three assert that our Lord ate the Passover with his disciples (see Introduction, pp. 92-94.). However this matter be finally settled, if the 14th of Nisan was the day on which the Passover was killed, "between the evenings," the 13th was reckoned as the first day before the Passover, and the sixth day would be the 8th of Nisan. If the weekly sabbath occurred on the 16th, then the 9th also was a sabbath. The Lord would then have reached Bethany on the eve of the sabbath, and have rested on the sabbath itself. The evening of the 9th would be the occasion of the feast, and the 10th would correspond with Palm Sunday. If the Lord were crucified on the 14th, and the weekly sabbath coincided with the Passover-day of convocation, the 15th, then the previous sabbath was on the 8th, and our Lord must have reached Bethany in "the end of the sabbath," and then the feast was on the following day. When Jesus halted at Bethany, the vast crowd of pilgrims advanced into the suburbs of Jerusalem, encamping on the Mount of Olives, and would be ready for the great demonstration of the next day. Westcott, after Bengel, observes that John's Gospel begins and ends with a sacred week (cf. John 1:29-35, 43; John 2:1). Jesus therefore, sis days before the Passover, came to Bethany. The quiet rest of that last sabbath with the family at Bethany is a thought full of suggestion. Thoma accounts for the triumphal feast and anointing, "six days before the Passover," as answering to the day on which the lamb was separated from other and secular animals, and consecrated for this holy service (Exodus 12:3-6; Hebrews 7:26). The segregation, however, was partial or premature, and the anointing (see below) took place five days before the Passover. It is not said that the day of his arrival at Bethany is the day of the festive welcome. Bethany is described as the place where Lazarus was. The explanatory clause, he who had been dead, is not necessary, as the evangelist limits and explains sufficiently the great motive for his pause and presence at Bethany by adding, whom he (Jesus) raised from the dead. It is extraordinary that some most able expositors should be so unwilling to accept the synchronous statements of the synoptists. Their narrative is not out of harmony with the hypothesis that our Lord passed the previous days with the pilgrim-band from Peraea, and that, taking the head of the procession as it was passing through Jericho., he should thus have distinctly challenged the authorities, and taken up the public position to which they were anxious he should lay claim. By his visit to the house of Zacchaeus he proclaimed the new feature and spirit of his kingdom; by healing the blind man he gave a typical illustration of the work of grace needed by all his disciples; by resting at the home where human love and Divine power had been so wonderfully blended he called the most solemn attention to his supreme claims; by pressing on with urgency up the steep mountain pathway at the head of his disciples he seemed to be ready, in his own words, "to lay down his life, that he might take it again." The οϋν, according to Meyer, is simply the resumption of the narrative, but surely those are right who regard it as a distinct reference to John 11:55. The Sanhedrists had given the ἐντολή that if any knew where he was, they should declare it. Christ was resolved, now that his hour was come, to lift the whole responsibility from his friends, and take it upon himself. The other evangelists do not mention the halt. Their purpose was not a chronological one. They give the narrative of the anointing apart from its deepest meanings and consequences, apart from any references to Lazarus (see Matthew 26:6-12; Mark 14:1-11). There are other subtle omissions from the synoptists, the difficulties of which must be settled as between themselves. Thus, according to Mark 11:12 and 20, an interval of a whole day and night took place between the withering of the fig tree and the conversation about it, but Matthew makes the conversation follow immediately upon the miracle. In like manner, John abstains from any reference to the discussions in the temple, to the withering of the fig tree, to the cleansing of the temple, or to the parables which followed. 12:1-11 Christ had formerly blamed Martha for being troubled with much serving. But she did not leave off serving, as some, who when found fault with for going too far in one way, peevishly run too far another way; she still served, but within hearing of Christ's gracious words. Mary gave a token of love to Christ, who had given real tokens of his love to her and her family. God's Anointed should be our Anointed. Has God poured on him the oil of gladness above his fellows, let us pour on him the ointment of our best affections. In Judas a foul sin is gilded over with a plausible pretence. We must not think that those do no acceptable service, who do it not in our way. The reigning love of money is heart-theft. The grace of Christ puts kind comments on pious words and actions, makes the best of what is amiss, and the most of what is good. Opportunities are to be improved; and those first and most vigorously, which are likely to be the shortest. To consult to hinder the further effect of the miracle, by putting Lazarus to death, is such wickedness, malice, and folly, as cannot be explained, except by the desperate enmity of the human heart against God. They resolved that the man should die whom the Lord had raised to life. The success of the gospel often makes wicked men so angry, that they speak and act as if they hoped to obtain a victory over the Almighty himself.
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